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I have a demo script which shows the question quite nicely so I will show the script, then ask.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Dog dog = new Dog() { Age = 4 };

        //This approach (version A)
        dog.DisplayDogYears();

        //Or this approach (version B)
        displayDogYears(dog);

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    private static void displayDogYears(Dog d)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("The dog is {0} years old in human years.", d.Age * 7);
    }
}

public class Dog
{
    public int Age { get; set; }

    public void DisplayDogYears()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("The dog is {0} years old in human years.", Age * 7);
    }
}

There are 2 approaches which do the same thing (approach A and B). Are there any reasons to prefer one approach over another, in terms of scalability and readable code. I can see one advantage of the approach A is that this method is available to all instances of the Dog class (so nice and scalable and reusable and maintainable, however, when debugging it does mean I have to move between different classes (and VS has to jump to different files etc) instead of viewing everything in just one file.

Any thoughts?

Dave

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I put user view output into a view layer. Although, for a console application the benefits would be mostly lost. –  P.Brian.Mackey Jul 19 '12 at 13:57

9 Answers 9

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I would prefer to have a method in the class Dog:

public int GetAgeInHumanYears()
{
    return Age*7;
}

and call this method from the main with a format string you like.

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Oops, hit "not useful (-1)" by mistake - I did try to add 1 (which I have now done) so sorry for that! This is a better approach, simply because I can then decide what to do with the number. I guess if I always wanted to write it a console, then the original post is better, but if I want to have contorl what I do with the result, then your method FTW! Thank you –  Dave Jul 19 '12 at 13:39
1  
+1 this is the way to go. What does the Dog class have to do with the Console? Nothing, so it should not know what a console is nor use it. What if i want to use it in a windows app. Long story short, keep framework or ui functionality out of your "model" classes. –  dowhilefor Jul 19 '12 at 13:41
    
Thank you dowhilefor –  Dave Jul 19 '12 at 13:46

In this case, the method should be on the class (Dog) since it is functionality that is specific to Dog objects.

Incidentally, dog -> human years isn't a simple geometric multiplication - the curve starts to smooth out as the dog ages, so the multiplier decreases.

Dog Years

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+1 for dog years facts! –  RhysW Jul 19 '12 at 13:52

when debugging it does mean I have to move between different classes (and VS has to jump to different files etc) instead of viewing everything in just one file

Are all of your keys on one gigantic key ring? Are all of your paper files in one pile on your desk?

Separate methods into the classes they belong to. Maybe you actually need a third class to convert from Dog years (or generically Animal years) to Human years. Having everything in one (or a few) classes limits reuse, maintainability (you have to run the program in the debugger to figure out what it's doing), and extensibility.

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+1 for good everyday references like a massive stack of paper! –  RhysW Jul 19 '12 at 13:49
    
I never thought about that, (and we're paperless but I guess that means I'm missing the point :) ) - Yes, of course I file everything away to where it belongs. Thank you. –  Dave Jul 19 '12 at 13:54

this approach would be even better. as your class is not directly outputting anything. so everything is still controlled by the main class. It makes it a lot easier I find to read what the code is doing.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Dog dog = new Dog() { Age = 4 };

        //This approach (version A)
        Console.WriteLine(dog.DisplayDogYears());

        Console.ReadKey();
    }


}

public class Dog
{
    public int Age { get; set; }

    public String DisplayDogYears()
    {
        return("The dog is {0} years old in human years.", Age * 7);
    }
}
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Awe, Felice Pollano beat me to the punch.. –  Eric Robinson Jul 19 '12 at 13:40
    
This is great. Nice and maintainable. Again, like Felice's response, you favor option A! Thank you for taking the time to answer. –  Dave Jul 19 '12 at 13:40
    
option A is the more conventional for sure.. option B in bigger projects tends to become unfavorable. –  Eric Robinson Jul 19 '12 at 13:42
1  
@DaveRook: Also note that jumping between various classes/files while debugging will not be a concern in real projects. They comprise of literally dozens of classes/files anyway, and your stacktrace will almost always span a multitude of them. –  O. R. Mapper Jul 19 '12 at 13:44
    
Thank you O.R Mapper. –  Dave Jul 19 '12 at 13:46

Dave, it is a matter of segregation. What if you're adding a Cat class? Will you add a new method saying DisplayCatYears? If you have it in the Dog class - you could just extract common interface for this and have one method writing age of animal passed as a parameter by utilizing polymorphism.

Even more, I don't think you will feel comfortable when your program exceeds few screens length ans will have everything in one file.

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My goodness - I've put X posts about why using interfaces, and in one simple swoop you've not only answered my question, but also explained a use for interfaces. Thank you –  Dave Jul 19 '12 at 13:50

Well best practice also says to have each class on its own, so the Dog class wouldnt be with the main part of the application but kept seperate. By this logic it is then best to have each method relating to that class to be inside the class. For example say you had 20 classes, 20 animals each with a different way to calculate age, would you want to have all 20 classes and all 20 methods thrown randomly about on the same page? yes? well then there is something wrong with you!

You want to keep code clean and accessible, each class on its own, each method that is specifically for that class inside it. For example, the Dog class doesnt need to know how the Cat years are calculated, its irrelevant to itself, so cat years in cat class, dog years in dog class,

This is tidier, easy to use and read and also better for reuseability! say you now wanted to use your dog class in another project, you would be stuck having to slice out first the class, then pouring through the lines of code looking for all the methods that the class needs. If they were inside it, all in one place, it will speed up your coding and allow you to move on to bigger challenges!

I won't even mention though that classes you expect to reuse should be inside a shared library for ease of reuse.

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It truly is a matter of preference.

I may be wording the rest of this badly, but without going too deep:

There are several factors to consider:

  • Readability
  • Code reuse
  • The poor maintenance programmer who's going to have to maintain it. (But that's probably readability)

In this example, I think all factors point to having it in the Dog class.

Classes in code should reflect real-life objects.

  • Readability: To me, a dog has an age in years, and in Dog Years, so it should be a property of the dog. (That's option C - unshown in your question) rather than a method in the calling program.
  • Code Reuse: If you write another app that needs to use the Dog class, and needs to get the age in Dog Years, you'd have to rewrite the code.

In short, the real-life-to-code-object mapping is that the dog years are a part of the dog, not the calling program.

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Decouple your Dog class from your Console yet still allow your Dog class to display its own age.

public class Dog
{
    public int Age { get; set; }
    private int dogYears { get { return Age * 7; } }

    public void DisplayDogYears(TextWriter writer)
    {
        writer.WriteLine(
            "The dog is {0} years old in human years.", 
            dogYears);
    }
}

You could then display the dog years to any TextWriter:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var dog = new Dog { Age = 4 };

    // This will output to the console
    dog.DisplayDogYears(Console.Out);

    // This will output to the 'sb' StringBuilder
    var sb = new StringBuilder();
    dog.DisplayDogYears(new StringWriter(sb));
}
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Depends,

Do you need the method to be capable of being called in different classes, i.e. you want it reusable? Choose A.

Is it being called in only one class/method use B.

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