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I am trying to monitor my threads in the Quartz scheduler. I need to come up with an estimation of how much memory needed for executing my jobs.

I am trying to use the method:

    import java.lang.management.ManagementFactory;

    ManagementFactory.getThreadMXBean().getThreadAllocationBytes();

However, in Eclipse I am getting an error:

The method getThreadAllocationBytes() is undefined for the type ThreadMXBean

I searched and found out that the method was introduced in JDK6u25 and since Eclipse is using its own compiler I cannot fix the problem.

Compiling the class without Eclipse seems to be a weak solution since I need to be able to compile the project using Eclipse.

Can you give me some advice on how to fix this problem?

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1  
You can always change your compiler settings for your project in Eclipse, if that's what you're looking for. Project > Properties > Java Compiler > Enable Project specific settings –  Sujay Jul 19 '12 at 13:52
    
That does not work. It allows selecting between major versions of JDK. The method I need introdiced in JDK6u25 eclipse allows me to select only 1.6 –  Alper Jul 19 '12 at 14:39
    
Google finds no references to a method named getThreadAllocationBytes (other than this SO question). It's also not listed on GrepCode.com as part of the ThreadMXBean class, in any version. Where are you seeing documentation about that method? –  E-Riz Jul 19 '12 at 14:40
    
@E-Riz I don't know how you googled it but here is the API link . Also I can use the same functionality from JConsole but I need to use it in code. –  Alper Jul 19 '12 at 15:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The ManagementFactory gives you a java.lang.management.ThreadMXBean, but the method you want to call is inside the com.sun.management.ThreadMXBean interface (which extends the java.lang.management.ThreadMXBean interface).

If your are running on a Sun/Oracle VM, you can cast the result and call the method:

((com.sun.management.ThreadMXBean)ManagementFactory.getThreadMXBean())
   .getThreadAllocatedBytes();

But of course this will fail on other VMs. Also the com.sun package is not recommended to be used, because classes there might change at any time (even at minor updates to the VM). So it's best to be careful when using this and making your code not relying on it.

Edit If you still can't compile this, but it works using reflection, there is a nicer way than reflection. The Java Management API has special support for accessing beans and attributes by names, because it is very often that you want to display them without knowing of them at compile time (think of a generic JMX client like JConsole or VisualVM).

Use the following code:

ObjectName threadMxBean = new ObjectName(ManagementFactory.THREAD_MXBEAN_NAME);
MBeanServer mbeanServer = ManagementFactory.getPlatformMBeanServer();
long[] memUsedPerThread = (long[]) mbeanServer.getAttribute(threadMxBean, "ThreadAllocatedBytes");

This should work, but I cannot test it, because on my JVM, the attribute is not there. If it does not work, use JConsole or VisualVM, connect to your Java process and verify that the attribute is indeed there with the correct name.

You can also have a look at the JMX documentation.

Edit 2 In your code example, you used getThreadAllocationBytes, but the link to the API shows getThreadAllocatedBytes. Double-check that you got that right. It was wrong in my answer, I fixed it now.

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I missed this :/ Thanks this is the thing I was looking for. –  Alper Jul 19 '12 at 15:40
  • You can always change your compiler settings for your project in Eclipse, if that's what you're looking for. Project > Properties > Java Compiler > Enable Project specific settings

  • You can also change the JRE System Library as follows:Project > Build Path > Configure Build Path > JRE System Library > Edit. From here you can select a different execution environment or choose to add an alternate JRE.

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Did you try the build path option (2nd part) and pointing to your JDK6u25 installed in your system? –  Sujay Jul 19 '12 at 15:16
    
That does not work. It allows selecting between major versions of JDK. The method I need introduced in JDK6u25 eclipse allows me to select only 1.6 –  Alper Jul 19 '12 at 15:19
    
It is disabled and I cannot change it from my home PC, I will try it tomorrow at work. But it seems that it will be useful for selecting the compiler compliance level, not the specific JDK version. –  Alper Jul 19 '12 at 15:25

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