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I am trying to figure a way to loop through a template argument list but without success

I cannot use c++11 variadic template feature and it need it to be done at compile time

I can assume there will be no positive argument after a negative one

any idea ?

template< int F1, int F2 ,int F3>
struct TemplatedClass
{
    TemplatedClass();
    update()
    {
        /* 
          for each positive template argument 
             call a method
        */
    }
};
share|improve this question
    
Is the number of template arguments fixed? – Armen Tsirunyan Jul 19 '12 at 13:46
    
it is fixed yes, (although can be quite long) – Pierre Jul 19 '12 at 13:48
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since you will have a finite number of template arguments, you can use a series of if statements.

template<int F1, int F2 ,int F3> 
struct TemplatedClass 
{ 
    TemplatedClass(); 
    update() 
    {
    if (F1 > 0) myfunc(); 
    if (F2 > 0) myfunc(); 
    if (F3 > 0) myfunc(); 
        // etc.*  
    } 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
yeah, the list can be quite long, so I d like to avoid it if possible, but it may be the only solution – Pierre Jul 19 '12 at 13:48
    
@Pierre, I think you're stuck with it. – ThomasMcLeod Jul 19 '12 at 13:51
1  
@Pierre, you could think about passing int * to static memory instead of a large number of int. – ThomasMcLeod Jul 19 '12 at 13:53
    
You can use the boost preprocessor library so you only write the line once and the preprocessor will duplicate it as many times as asked. – Marc Glisse Jan 8 '13 at 17:29

Instead of writing a series of if statements you can also put all the arguments into an array and iterate through it. This way compiler won't be able to optimize your code (you didn't specify if this is required), but it will look much cleaner I think. E.g.

template<int F1, int F2 ,int F3>
struct TemplatedClass
{ 
    TemplatedClass(); 
    update() 
    {
        const int array[] = {F1, F2, F3};
        // replace this with std::for_each(...) with functors you need
        for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(array)/sizeof(array[0]); ++i)
        {
            myfunc(array[i]);
        }
    } 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
I like this solution, unfortunately myfunc is a template too in my case and it would not accept array[i] as it not constant. thanks anyway – Pierre Jul 19 '12 at 14:08

With the number of template arguments fixed, a simple code like this will do:

update()
{
    if (F1 > 0) callAMethod();
    if (F2 > 0) callAMethod();
    if (F3 > 0) callAMethod();
}

The expressions in the if statement are compile-time constants, so the optimizer will optimize it into the code that is equivalent to either calling the method "unguarded" (without a branch) or not calling the method at all. In other words, the decision to call the method or not will be made at compile time by the optimizer for no run-time cost.

share|improve this answer

Or use helper template if you are not sure the optimizer will get rid of the ifs:

void functionToCall(int number) { /* ... */ }

template<bool doCall>
struct FuncCaller {
    template<typename Callable>
    FuncCaller(Callable func, int number) { func(number); }
};

template<>
struct FuncCaller<false> {
    template<typename Callable>
    FuncCaller(Callable, int) {}
};

update()
{
    FuncCaller<(F1 > 0)>(functionToCall, F1);
    FuncCaller<(F2 > 0)>(functionToCall, F2);
    FuncCaller<(F3 > 0)>(functionToCall, F3);
}
share|improve this answer

you could try doing that using Boost Metaprogramming libraries, but requires you to change the template definition of the class to make room for Boost MPL parameters.

An example of what you want to do with Boost::MPL would be:

#include <boost/mpl/vector.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/empty.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/back.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/pop_back.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/if.hpp>
#include <iostream>

using namespace boost::mpl;
template<class T>
class Test {
public:
  void funcToCall() {
    std::cout << "I'm called\n";
  }
  void update();
};

template<class Y, class T>
struct Update {
  static void update(T* t) {
    typedef typename pop_back<Y>::type vec_less;
    if (back<Y>::type::value > 0)
      t->funcToCall();
    Update<typename if_<empty<vec_less>, void, vec_less >::type, T>::update(t);
  }
};
template<class T>
struct Update<void ,T> {
  static void update(T* t) {}
};

template<class T>
void Test<T>::update() {

Update<T, Test<T> >::update(this);

}


int main() {
  Test<vector<int_<0>,int_<4>, int_<9> > > t;
  t.update();
  return 0;
}

The class "Test" would be your original "TemplatedClass". Now instead of getting a list of int template parameters you just get one parameter that is a boost::mpl::vector. This contains all the ints you want to pass and then you call the update function that will call recursively the update methods from struct "Update" that will have the duty of calling the "funcToCall()" method if the int is more than 0.

The output of the program I pasted above is:

MacBook-Pro-di-Marcello:~ Kariddi$ ./test

I'm called

I'm called

Of course you need the Boost libs for this example to work.

You can find information about MPL here:

http://www.boost.org/libs/mpl/doc/index.html

Cheers, Marcello

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