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I would like to know if anyone can suggest a way to sum lists that is faster than map(sum, zip(*list)).

Example:

import timeit

print timeit.Timer('''
[ (a[x]+b[x]+c[x]) for x in xrange(len(a)) ]
''', '''
a = range(200)
b = range(199,-1,-1)
c = range(1,201)
''').timeit(number = 1000)

print timeit.Timer('''
map(sum,zip(*d))
''', '''
a = range(200)
b = range(199,-1,-1)
c = range(1,201)
d = [a,b,c]''').timeit(number = 1000)

print timeit.Timer('''
[sum(x) for x in zip(*d)]
''', '''
a = range(200)
b = range(199,-1,-1)
c = range(1,201)
d = [a,b,c]''').timeit(number = 1000)

Results:

0.0317891459248 #list comprehension
0.0406545608382 #sum with zip
0.0532605665307 #map sum with zip

Note: I know I am nitpicking, but I'm just curious if anyone has a better suggestion.

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1  
itertools.izip may be more efficient –  jamylak Jul 19 '12 at 14:36
    
@Hooked -- Really? I'm not sure that I believe that ... The parenthesis don't do anything and should be removed by the parser. –  mgilson Jul 19 '12 at 14:56
    
@mgilson I think you are correct - I tried a timing test and it showed that % change and it was reproducible - until it wasn't. I've removed the comment. For posterity, the comment deleted claimed that the first example was faster if the () were removed. –  Hooked Jul 19 '12 at 15:07
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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

How about this one?

print timeit.Timer('''
d.sum(axis=0)
''', '''
import numpy as np
a = range(200)
b = range(199,-1,-1)
c = range(1,201)
d = np.array([a,b,c])''').timeit(number = 1000)

Of course, this assumes that your lists contain some sort of numeric type...

share|improve this answer
    
It seems faster, but if you count the time spent transforming the list into a numpy array, it's substantially slower - so I suppose there's a caveat here. –  TimY Jul 19 '12 at 14:48
    
@Tim_Y now if your data a,b,c was already a numpy array, that's a totally different story... –  Hooked Jul 19 '12 at 14:49
    
@Hooked - yes, that's what I meant in my comment. –  TimY Jul 19 '12 at 14:50
1  
@Tim_Y -- Yeah. I think the point is that if you want efficiency with numeric arrays, then selecting numpy ndarrays as your datatype is a good design decision. The code will be easier to read and execute faster than the alternative. –  mgilson Jul 19 '12 at 14:53
    
@mgilson To match with OP's examples, that needs to be axis=0, otherwise you end up with simply returning the sum of a,b,c not the sum along each column. –  Hooked Jul 19 '12 at 15:04
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