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I had the following query:

SELECT nvl(sum(adjust1),0)
FROM (
  SELECT
    ManyOperationsOnFieldX adjust1,
    a, b, c, d, e
  FROM (
    SELECT
      a, b, c, d, e,
      SubStr(balance, INSTR(balance, '[&&2~', 1, 1)) X
    FROM
      table
    WHERE
      a >= To_Date('&&1','YYYYMMDD')
      AND a < To_Date('&&1','YYYYMMDD')+1
  )
)
WHERE
  b LIKE ...
  AND e IS NULL
  AND adjust1>0
  AND (b NOT IN ('...','...','...'))
  OR  (b = '... AND c <> NULL)

I tried to change it to this:

SELECT nvl(sum(adjust1),0)
FROM (
  SELECT
    ManyOperationsOnFieldX adjust1
  FROM (
    SELECT
      SubStr(balance, INSTR(balance, '[&&2~', 1, 1)) X
    FROM
      table
    WHERE
      a >= To_Date('&&1','YYYYMMDD')
      AND a < To_Date('&&1','YYYYMMDD')+1
      AND b LIKE '..'
      AND e IS NULL
      AND (b NOT IN ('..','..','..'))
      OR  (b='..' AND c <> NULL)
  )
)
WHERE
  adjust1>0

Mi intention was to have all the filtering in the innermost query, and only give to the outer ones the field X which is the one I have to operate a lot. However, the firts (original) query takes a couple of seconds to execute, while the second one won't even finish. I waited for almost 20 minutes and still I wouldn't get the answer.

Is there an obvious reason for this to happen that I might be overlooking?

These are the plans for each of them:

SELECT STATEMENT optimizer=all_rows (cost = 973 Card = 1 bytes = 288)
  SORT (aggregate)
    PARTITION RANGE (single) (cost=973 Card = 3 bytes = 864)
      TABLE ACCESS (full) OF "table" #3 TABLE Optimizer = analyzed(cost=973 Card = 3 bytes=564)


SELECT STATEMENT optimizer=all_rows (cost = 750.354 Card = 1 bytes = 288)
  SORT (aggregate)
    PARTITION RANGE (ALL) (cost=759.354 Cart = 64.339 bytes = 18.529.632)
      TABLE ACCESS (full) OF "table" #3 TABLE Optimizer = analyzed(cost=750.354 Card = 64.339 bytes=18.529.632)
share|improve this question
1  
What is the explain plan for each query? –  Ollie Jul 19 '12 at 14:51
    
There's a syntax error in the second SQL - the stray comma after adjust1 (where the first SQL had a list a, b, ... on the next line that is missing in the second SQL). –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 19 '12 at 14:53
3  
The plan shows that your second query is scanning all partitions on your table whereas the first is only scanning one partition hence it is faster. Look at the difference in cost between the two scans. –  Ollie Jul 19 '12 at 15:00
1  
Could you add the table structure including indexes and partiton key too? –  Ollie Jul 19 '12 at 15:07
1  
I think I got it. There's an index on field 'a', the only one used in the innermost query. I suppose that when adding the rest of the conditions there as well you loose the advantage of the index –  Alex Jul 19 '12 at 15:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is all about your OR... Try this:

SELECT nvl(sum(adjust1),0)
FROM (
  SELECT
    ManyOperationsOnFieldX adjust1
  FROM (
    SELECT
      SubStr(balance, INSTR(balance, '[&&2~', 1, 1)) X
    FROM
      table
    WHERE
      a >= To_Date('&&1','YYYYMMDD')
      AND a < To_Date('&&1','YYYYMMDD')+1
      AND (
          b LIKE '..'
          AND e IS NULL
          AND (b NOT IN ('..','..','..'))
          OR  (b='..' AND c <> NULL)
      )
  )
)
WHERE
  adjust1>0

Because you have the OR inline with the rest of your AND statements with no parenthesis, the 2nd version isn't limiting the data checked to just the rows that fall in the date filter. For more info, see the documentation of Condition Precedence

share|improve this answer
    
That was it. Thank you!! –  Alex Jul 19 '12 at 15:15

Your two queries are not identical.

the logical operator AND is evaluated before the operator OR:

SQL> WITH data AS
  2          (SELECT rownum id
  3             FROM dual
  4           CONNECT BY level <= 10)
  5  SELECT *
  6    FROM data
  7   WHERE id = 2
  8     AND id = 3
  9      OR  id = 5;

        ID
----------
         5

So your first query means: Give me the big SUM over this partition when the data is this way.

Your second query means: give me the big SUM over (this partition when the data is this way) or (when the data is this other way [no partition elimination hence big full scan])

Be careful when mixing the logical operators AND and OR. My advice would be to use brackets so as to avoid any confusion.

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