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It is simple enough to get timestamp:

new Date().getTime();

but I need to limit the timestamp to 8 characters, and these need to be the last 8 rather than the first 8.

for example:

new Date().getTime(); // returns: 1234567891234

I need it to return:

67891234

can you help?

Thanks in advance

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4  
Convert to string -> substring. –  Felix Kling Jul 19 '12 at 15:03
    
@Felix Kling - isn't modulus(%) simpler? –  Lobo Jul 19 '12 at 15:16
    
@Lobo: Didn't think about that :D –  Felix Kling Jul 19 '12 at 15:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
new Date().getTime().toString().substr(-8);
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You can't use negative lengths in substring. –  Rocket Hazmat Jul 19 '12 at 15:10
    
Yes you can. Try it into jsfiddle or your browser's console. –  Florent Jul 19 '12 at 15:12
    
@Florent: No you can't: jsfiddle.net/ShF52 From the docs: "An integer between 0 and..." –  Rocket Hazmat Jul 19 '12 at 15:14
    
It's substr not substring ... –  Florent Jul 19 '12 at 15:15
    
@Florent:... Goddammit JavaScript. I didn't realize there was substr and substring =/ Sorry :-P –  Rocket Hazmat Jul 19 '12 at 15:16

You can try this:

var last8numbers = String(new Date().getTime()).substr(-8);

From Mozilla's substr documentation:

If start is negative, substr uses it as a character index from the end of the string.

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Just use % (modulus) to get the value you want. You don't need to convert the value to string at all.

var x = new Date().getTime(); 
var y = x%100000000;

This code prints 1234567891234 & 67891234

var x = 1234567891234;
var y = x%100000000;
alert(x + " & " + y);​
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Huh, that works? Neat! –  Rocket Hazmat Jul 19 '12 at 15:17
1  
@Rocket if it doesn't then what I learnt in college is wrong. :-) –  Lobo Jul 19 '12 at 15:19
1  
This is a great answer if you want to end up with an integer. Just depends on what data type you need. This is going to be better performance (I imagine) if you need a number. –  PCasagrande Jul 19 '12 at 17:24
    
I must admit if I saw this in code I'd think wtf. Not very obvious as to what its doing... –  Chris Moutray Sep 7 '12 at 15:18
    
@Chris Moutray - that is why comments are for. –  Lobo Sep 7 '12 at 18:38

Given:

var foo = 1234567891234;
foo.toString().substring(foo.length - 8, foo.length); // returns 67891234
share|improve this answer
    
Answer updated. –  Daniel Li Jul 19 '12 at 15:07

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