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I'm trying to write huge amounts of data onto my SSD(solid state drive). And by huge amounts I mean 80GB.

I browsed the web for solutions, but the best I came up with was this:

#include <fstream>
using namespace std;
const unsigned long long size = 64ULL*1024ULL*1024ULL;
unsigned long long a[size];
int main()
{
    fstream myfile;
    myfile = fstream("file.binary", ios::out | ios::binary);
    //Here would be some error handling
    for(int i = 0; i < 32; ++i){
        //Some calculations to fill a[]
        myfile.write((char*)&a,size*sizeof(unsigned long long));
    }
    myfile.close();
}

Compiled with Visual Studio 2010 and full optimizations and run under Windows7 this program maxes out around 20MB/s. What really bothers me is that Windows can copy files from an other SSD to this SSD at somewhere between 150MB/s and 200MB/s. So at least 7 times faster. That's why I think I should be able to go faster.

Any ideas how I can speed up my writing?

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7  
Did your timing results exclude the time it takes to do your computations to fill a[] ? –  catchmeifyoutry Jul 19 '12 at 15:24
3  
I've actually done this task before. Using simple fwrite() I could get around 80% of peak write speeds. Only with FILE_FLAG_NO_BUFFERING was I ever able to get max speed. –  Mysticial Jul 19 '12 at 15:26
14  
This code DOES NOT COMPILE so this is not the code you tested with. Please COPY AND PASTE your exact code that you use so we can compare it with other methods. –  Loki Astari Jul 19 '12 at 15:31
6  
I'm not sure it's fair to compare your file writeing to a SSD-to-SSD copying. It might well be that SSD-to-SSD works on a lower level, avoiding the C++ libraries, or using direct memory access (DMA). Copying something is not the same as writing arbitrary values to a random access file. –  Igor F. Jul 19 '12 at 15:36
3  
@IgorF.: That's just wrong speculation; it's a perfectly fair comparison (if nothing else, in favor of file writing). Copying across a drive in Windows is just read-and-write; nothing fancy/complicated/different going on underneath. –  Mehrdad Jul 19 '12 at 15:46
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10 Answers

up vote 90 down vote accepted

This did the job:

#include <stdio.h>
const unsigned long long size = 8ULL*1024ULL*1024ULL;
unsigned long long a[size];

int main()
{
    FILE* pFile;
    pFile = fopen("file.binary", "wb");
    for (unsigned long long j = 0; j < 1024; ++j){
        //Some calculations to fill a[]
        fwrite(a, 1, size*sizeof(unsigned long long), pFile);
    }
    fclose(pFile);
    return 0;
}

I just timed 8GB in 36sec, which is about 220MB/s and I think that maxes out my SSD. Also worth to note, the code at the beginning of my post used one core 100%, whereas this code only uses 2-5%.

Thanks a lot to everyone.

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6  
+1 Yeah, this was the first thing I tried. FILE* is faster than streams. I wouldn't have expected such a difference since it "should've" been I/O bound anyway. –  Mysticial Jul 19 '12 at 16:13
5  
Can we conclude that C-style I/O is (strangely) much faster than C++ streams? –  SChepurin Jul 19 '12 at 16:26
13  
@SChepurin: If you're being pedantic, probably not. If you're being practical, probably yes. :) –  Mehrdad Jul 19 '12 at 16:34
5  
Could you please explain (for a C++ dunce like me) the difference between the two approaches, and why this one works so much faster than the original? –  Mike Chamberlain Jul 25 '12 at 14:00
5  
Does prepending ios::sync_with_stdio(false); make any difference for the code with stream? I'm just curious how big difference there is between using this line and not, but I don't have the fast enough disk to check the corner case. And if there is any real difference. –  Artur Czajka Jul 25 '12 at 23:29
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Try the following, in order:

  • Smaller buffer size. Writing ~2 MiB at a time might be a good start. On my last laptop, ~512 KiB was the sweet spot, but I haven't tested on my SSD yet.

    Note: I've noticed that very large buffers tend to decrease performance. I've noticed speed losses with using 16-MiB buffers instead of 512-KiB buffers before.

  • Use _open (or _topen if you want to be Windows-correct) to open the file, then use _write. This will probably avoid a lot of buffering, but it's not certain to.

  • Using Windows-specific functions like CreateFile and WriteFile. That will avoid any buffering in the standard library.

share|improve this answer
    
Check any benchmark results posted online. You need either 4kB writes with a queue depth of 32 or more, or else 512K or higher writes, to get any sort of decent throughput. –  Ben Voigt Jul 19 '12 at 16:06
    
@BenVoigt: Yup, that correlates with me saying 512 KiB was the sweet spot for me. :) –  Mehrdad Jul 19 '12 at 16:07
    
Yes. From my experience, smaller buffer sizes are usually optimal. The exception is when you're using FILE_FLAG_NO_BUFFERING - in which larger buffers tend to be better. Since I think FILE_FLAG_NO_BUFFERING is pretty much DMA. –  Mysticial Jul 19 '12 at 16:12
add comment

I see no difference between std::stream/FILE/device. Between buffering and non buffering.

Also note:

  • SSD drives "tend" to slow down (lower transfer rates) as they fill up.
  • SSD drives "tend" to slow down (lower transfer rates) as they get older (because of non working bits).

I am seeing the code run in 63 secondds.
Thus a transfer rate of: 260M/s (my SSD look slightly faster than yours).

64 * 1024 * 1024 * 8 /*sizeof(unsigned long long) */ * 32 /*Chunks*/

= 16G
= 16G/63 = 260M/s

I get a no increase by moving to FILE* from std::fstream.

#include <stdio.h>

using namespace std;

int main()
{

    FILE* stream = fopen("binary", "w");

    for(int loop=0;loop < 32;++loop)
    {
         fwrite(a, sizeof(unsigned long long), size, stream);
    }
    fclose(stream);

}

So the C++ stream are working as fast as the underlying library will allow.

But I think it is unfair comparing the OS to an application that is built on-top of the OS. The application can make no assumptions (it does not know the drives are SSD) and thus uses the file mechanisms of the OS for transfer.

While the OS does not need to make any assumptions. It can tell the types of the drives involved and use the optimal technique for transferring the data. In this case a direct memory to memory transfer. Try writing a program that copies 80G from 1 location in memory to another and see how fast that is.

Edit

I changed my code to use the lower level calls:
ie no buffering.

#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>


const unsigned long long size = 64ULL*1024ULL*1024ULL;
unsigned long long a[size];
int main()
{
    int data = open("test", O_WRONLY | O_CREAT, 0777);
    for(int loop = 0; loop < 32; ++loop)
    {   
        write(data, a, size * sizeof(unsigned long long));
    }   
    close(data);
}

This made no diffference.

NOTE: My drive is an SSD drive if you have a normal drive you may see a difference between the two techniques above. But as I expected non buffering and buffering (when writting large chunks greater than buffer size) make no difference.

Edit 2:

Have you tried the fastest method of copying files in C++

int main()
{
    std::ifstream  input("input");
    std::ofstream  output("ouptut");

    output << input.rdbuf();
}
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4  
I didn't downvote, but your buffer size is too small. I did it with the same 512 MB buffer the OP is using and I get 20 MB/s with streams vs. 90 MB/s with FILE*. –  Mysticial Jul 19 '12 at 16:05
    
Also your way with fwrite(a, sizeof(unsigned long long), size, stream); instead of fwrite(a, 1, size*sizeof(unsigned long long), pFile); gives me 220MB/s with chunks of 64MB per write. –  PanicSheep Jul 19 '12 at 16:14
    
@Mysticial: It surprises my that buffer size makes a difference (though I believe you). The buffer is useful when you have lots of small writes so that the underlying device is not bothered with many requests. But when you are writing huge chunks there is no need for a buffer when writing/reading (on a blocking device). As such the data should be passed directly to the underlying device (thus by-passing the buffer). Though if you see a difference this would contradict this and make my wonder why the write is actually using a buffer at all. –  Loki Astari Jul 19 '12 at 17:22
    
The best solution is NOT to increase the buffer size but to remove the buffer and make write pass the data directly to the underlying device. –  Loki Astari Jul 19 '12 at 17:22
    
But this does not change my though that it is an unfair comparison. –  Loki Astari Jul 19 '12 at 17:25
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Try using open()/write()/close() API calls and experiment with the output buffer size. I mean do not pass the whole "many-many-bytes" buffer at once, do a couple of writes (i.e., TotalNumBytes / OutBufferSize). OutBufferSize can be from 4096 bytes to megabyte.

Another try - use WinAPI OpenFile/CreateFile and use this MSDN article to turn off buffering (FILE_FLAG_NO_BUFFERING). And this MSDN article on WriteFile() shows how to get the block size for the drive to know the optimal buffer size.

Anyway, std::ofstream is a wrapper and there might be blocking on I/O operations. Keep in mind that traversing the entire N-gigabyte array also takes some time. While you are writing a small buffer, it gets to the cache and works faster.

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Could you use FILE* instead, and the measure the performance you've gained? A couple of options is to use fwrite/write instead of fstream:

#include <stdio.h>

int main ()
{
  FILE * pFile;
  char buffer[] = { 'x' , 'y' , 'z' };
  pFile = fopen ( "myfile.bin" , "w+b" );
  fwrite (buffer , 1 , sizeof(buffer) , pFile );
  fclose (pFile);
  return 0;
}

If you decide to use write, try something similar:

#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

int main(void)
{
    int filedesc = open("testfile.txt", O_WRONLY | O_APPEND);

    if (filedesc < 0) {
        return -1;
    }

    if (write(filedesc, "This will be output to testfile.txt\n", 36) != 36) {
        write(2, "There was an error writing to testfile.txt\n", 43);
        return -1;
    }

    return 0;
}

I would also advice you to look into memory map. That may be your answer. Once I had to process a 20GB file in other to store it in the database, and the file as not even opening. So the solution as to utilize moemory map. I did that in Python though.

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Actually, a straight-forward FILE* equivalent of the original code using the same 512 MB buffer gets full speed. Your current buffer is too small. –  Mysticial Jul 19 '12 at 15:53
    
@Mysticial But that's just an example. –  philippe Jul 19 '12 at 15:54
add comment

Try to use memory-mapped files.

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2  
I don't think they're a good idea here. –  Mehrdad Jul 19 '12 at 15:45
    
@Mehrdad but why? Because it's a platform dependent solution? –  qehgt Jul 19 '12 at 15:45
2  
No... it's because in order to do fast sequential file writing, you need to write large amounts of data at once. (Say, 2-MiB chunks is probably a good starting point.) Memory mapped files don't let you control the granularity, so you're at the mercy of whatever the memory manager decides to prefetch/buffer for you. In general, I've never seen them be as effective as normal reading/writing with ReadFile and such for sequential access, although for random access they may well be better. –  Mehrdad Jul 19 '12 at 15:48
3  
@Mysticial: People 'know" a lot of things that are just plain wrong. –  Ben Voigt Jul 19 '12 at 15:53
1  
@qehgt: If anything, paging is much more optimized for random access than sequential access. Reading 1 page of data is much slower than reading 1 megabyte of data in a single operation. –  Mehrdad Jul 19 '12 at 15:54
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I'd suggest trying file mapping. I used mmapin the past, in a UNIX environment, and I was impressed by the high performance I could achieve

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@nalply It's still a working, efficient and interesting solution to keep in mind. –  Yam Marcovic Jul 24 '12 at 20:13
    
stackoverflow.com/a/2895799/220060 about the pros an cons of mmap. Especially note "For pure sequential accesses to the file, it is also not always the better solution [...]" Also stackoverflow.com/questions/726471, it effectively says that on a 32-bit system you are limited to 2 or 3 GB. - by the way, it's not me who downvoted that answer. –  nalply Jul 25 '12 at 8:53
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If you copy something from disk A to disk B in explorer, Windows employs DMA. That means for most of the copy process, the CPU will basically do nothing other than telling the disk controller where to put, and get data from, eliminating a whole step in the chain, and one that is not at all optimized for moving large amounts of data - and I mean hardware.

What you do involves the CPU a lot. I want to point you to the "Some calculations to fill a[]" part. Which I think is essential. You generate a[], then you copy from a[] to an output buffer (thats what fstream::write does), then you generate again, etc.

What to do? Multithreading! (I hope you have a multi-core processor)

  • fork.
  • Use one thread to generate a[] data
  • Use the other to write data from a[] to disk
  • You will need two arrays a1[] and a2[] and switch between them
  • You will need some sort of synchronization between your threads (semaphores, message queue, etc.)
  • Use lower level, unbuffered, functions, like the the WriteFile function mentioned by Mehrdad
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I wrote a program for a student 2 month ago that create a 100MB binary file in its constructor`s class and ...

i compiled it by gcc in GNU/Linux and mingw in win 7 and win xp and worked good

you can use my program and to create a 80 GB file just change the line 33 to

makeFile("Text.txt",1024,8192000);

when exit the program the file will be destroyed then check the file when it is running

to have the program that you want just change the program

firt one is the windows program and the second is for GNU/Linux

http://mustafajf.persiangig.com/Projects/File/WinFile.cpp

http://mustafajf.persiangig.com/Projects/File/File.cpp

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If you want to write fast to file streams then you could make stream the read buffer larger:

wfstream f;
const size_t nBufferSize = 16184;
wchar_t buffer[nBufferSize];
f.rdbuf()->pubsetbuf(buffer, nBufferSize);

Also, when writing lots of data to files it is sometimes faster to logically extend the file size instead of physically, this is because when logically extending a file the file system does not zero the new space out before writing to it. It is also smart to logically extend the file more than you actually need to prevent lots of file extentions. Logical file extention is supported on Windows by calling SetFileValidData or xfsctl with XFS_IOC_RESVSP64 on XFS systems.

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