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Given the code below, is it possible to remove the index of p from the properties list using this style of for loop in Java?

List<Properties> propertiesList = new ArrayList<Properties>();
String keyToDelete = "blah";

for(Properties p : propertiesList) {
    if(p.getKey().equals(keyToDelete)) {
        propertiesList.remove(index) //How to remove the element at index 'p'
    }
}

This is how i would accomplish this with the other for loop

List<Properties> propertiesList = new ArrayList<Properties>();
String keyToDelete = "blah";

for(int i = 0; i < propertiesList.size(); i++) {
        if(p.getKey().equals(keyToDelete)) {
                propertiesList.remove(i);
        }
}
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5  
Your second version is actually wrong. Removing an elements shifts the indices of the elements after it, so you will skip over every element that comes after an element you want to remove. –  Tom Anderson Jul 19 '12 at 15:39
2  
One thing that no one seems to be touching on: wouldn't what you're trying to do cause a ConcurrentModificationException if we used the for-each loop? (Even if it doesn't, you have to deal with how elements in the list are shifting, as @TomAnderson pointed out.) –  Dennis Meng Jul 19 '12 at 15:39
1  
Looks like a Map would be better here. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 19 '12 at 15:41
    
Also note that the second solution will be O(N^2) for List implementations that don't implement RandomAccess. This could cause a performance problem with a large LinkedList. –  Sean Reilly Jul 19 '12 at 15:48
1  
Fixing the 2nd version is simple enough though; just iterate last element to first. BTDT. –  Dan Neely Jul 19 '12 at 17:26
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5 Answers 5

up vote 26 down vote accepted

The way to do this is with an explicit Iterator (no school like the old school!).

Iterator<Properties> it = propertiesList.iterator();
while (it.hasNext()) {
    if (it.next().getKey().equals(keyToDelete)) {
        it.remove();
    }
}

Unlike the remove method on a list, the remove method on the iterator doesn't cause a concurrent modification. It's the only safe way to remove an element from a collection you're iterating over. As the javadoc for that method says:

The behavior of an iterator is unspecified if the underlying collection is modified while the iteration is in progress in any way other than by calling this method.

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4  
+1 for mentioning concurrent modification. Most of the other answers don't handle the modification case properly — they either risk a ConcurrentModificationException, or there are bugs wrt incrementing the counter. –  Sean Reilly Jul 19 '12 at 15:45
    
As a caveat though, not all Iterators support a remove() operation. (I'm pretty sure it's fine for ArrayList, but it's still something to keep in mind.) –  Dennis Meng Jul 20 '12 at 0:18
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No, you need to use the old-school for loop to get an index.

You could of course add it yourself to the for-each loop, but then you would most probably be better off using the old variant instead.

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Or you can define an index outside of the for-each loop, and increment and use it inside. –  CPerkins Jul 19 '12 at 15:36
    
Couldnt you use some kind of iterator as well? –  Martin Larsson Jul 19 '12 at 15:38
    
If i would have to use an external counter, i might as well just switch to the old for loop. –  Catfish Jul 19 '12 at 15:38
    
@MartinLarsson: Sure, you could use an Iterator explicitly instead of letting for-each hide it if you need the reference. –  Keppil Jul 19 '12 at 15:40
    
He still won't be able to do what he has in the original, you aren't allowed to remove inside a for-each loop. –  NominSim Jul 19 '12 at 15:41
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How about using proper Iterator and its remove method?

List<Properties> propertiesList = new ArrayList<Properties>();
String keyToDelete = "blah";

for (
    Iterator<Properties> iter = propertiesList.iterator( );
    iter.hasNext( );
)
{
    Properties p = iter.next( );

    if(p.getKey().equals(keyToDelete)) {
        iter.remove( );
    }
}
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+1 for using Iterator in a for loop (better) rather than a while (not as good) –  Steve Kuo Jul 19 '12 at 17:37
    
@SteveKuo I disagree - the first argument here in the for is so long that it obscures understanding the line at a glance. –  Izkata Jul 19 '12 at 18:10
    
@Izkata. Now that it's split on separate lines, is it better. One clear advantage is that iter variable is contained inside the for loop scope. With while it is escaped into the method's scope. –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Jul 19 '12 at 20:38
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As Tim Anderson suggested you could also modify the list outside the loop

List<Properties> propertiesList = new ArrayList<Properties>();
String keyToDelete = "blah";
List<Properties> propertiesToRemove = new ArrayList<Properties>();


for(Properties p : propertiesList) {
    if(p.getKey().equals(keyToDelete)) {
        propertiesToRemove.add(p) ;
    }
}

propertiesList.removeAll(propertiesToRemove);
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As far as I know, foreach loop does not guarantee the order of elements it enumerates,

so if you will try Collection[i] you can get another element rather than currently iterated

It is can be clearly viewed in some multithreaded cases

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