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In a metro app, I need to execute a number of WCF calls. The number of calls to be made are enough that I need to do them in a parallel loop. The problem is the parallel loop exists before the awaitable wcf calls return.

How would you refactor this to work as expected?

var ids = new List<string>() { "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "10" };
var customers = new  System.Collections.Concurrent.BlockingCollection<Customer>();

Parallel.ForEach(ids, async i =>
{
    ICustomerRepo repo = new CustomerRepo();
    var cust = await repo.GetCustomer(i);
    customers.Add(cust);
});

foreach ( var customer in customers )
{
    Console.WriteLine(customer.ID);
}

Console.ReadKey();
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possible duplicate of await in Parallel.foreach –  Chris Moschini Nov 30 '13 at 19:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 39 down vote accepted

The whole idea behind Parallel.ForEach() is that you have a set of threads and each processes part of the collection. As you noticed, this doesn't work with async-await, where you want to release the thread for the duration of the async call.

You could “fix” that by blocking the ForEach() threads, but that defeats the whole point of async-await.

What you could do is to use TPL Dataflow instead of Parallel.ForEach(), which supports asynchronous Tasks well.

Specifically, your code could written using a TransformBlock that transforms each id into a Customer using the async lambda. This block can be configured to execute in parallel. You would link that block to an ActionBlock that writes each Customer to the console. After you set up the block network, you can Post() each id to the TransformBlock.

In code:

var ids = new List<string> { "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "10" };

var getCustomerBlock = new TransformBlock<string, Customer>(
    async i =>
    {
        ICustomerRepo repo = new CustomerRepo();
        return await repo.GetCustomer(i);
    }, new ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions
    {
        MaxDegreeOfParallelism = DataflowBlockOptions.Unbounded
    });
var writeCustomerBlock = new ActionBlock<Customer>(c => Console.WriteLine(c.ID));
getCustomerBlock.LinkTo(
    writeCustomerBlock, new DataflowLinkOptions
    {
        PropagateCompletion = true
    });

foreach (var id in ids)
    getCustomerBlock.Post(id);

getCustomerBlock.Complete();
writeCustomerBlock.Completion.Wait();

Although you probably want to limit the parallelism of the TransformBlock to some small constant. Also, you could limit the capacity of the TransformBlock and add the items to it asynchronously using SendAsync(), for example if the collection is too big.

As an added benefit when compared to your code (if it worked) is that the writing will start as soon as a single item is finished, and not wait until all of the processing is finished.

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A very brief overview of async, reactive extensions, TPL and TPL DataFlow - vantsuyoshi.wordpress.com/2012/01/05/… for those like myself who might need some clarity. –  Norman H Sep 13 '13 at 11:04

svick's answer is (as usual) excellent.

However, I find Dataflow to be more useful when you actually have large amounts of data to transfer. Or when you need an async-compatible queue.

In your case, a simpler solution is to just use the async-style parallelism:

var ids = new List<string>() { "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "10" };

var customerTasks = ids.Select(i =>
  {
    ICustomerRepo repo = new CustomerRepo();
    return repo.GetCustomer(i);
  });
var customers = await Task.WhenAll(customerTasks);

foreach (var customer in customers)
{
  Console.WriteLine(customer.ID);
}

Console.ReadKey();
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2  
If you wanted to manually limit parallelism (which you most likely do in this case), doing it this way would be more complicated. –  svick Jul 19 '12 at 16:50
    
Good point. Dataflow has nice knobs for that. –  Stephen Cleary Jul 19 '12 at 16:51
    
But you're right that Dataflow can be quite complicated (for example when compared with Parallel.ForEach()). But I think it's currently the best option to do almost any async work with collections. –  svick Jul 19 '12 at 16:53
    
@svick - IMHO it's a function of whether you're trying to set up 'streams' of processing (use Dataflow) or just parallelizing the processing of a collection (Parallel.ForEach, or create collections of Tasks and WhenAll on them as Stephen does here). If you're not setting up blocks to run for an extended period of time, Dataflow feels like overkill IMHO. :) –  James Manning Jul 19 '12 at 18:36
    
ParallelOptions lets you limit parallelism, FWIW, in case others run across this thread and don't already know about it –  James Manning Jul 19 '12 at 23:29

Using DataFlow as svick suggested may be overkill, and Stephen's answer does not provide the means to control the concurrency of the operation. However, that can be achieved rather simply:

public static async Task RunWithMaxDegreeOfConcurrency<T>(
     int maxDegreeOfConcurrency, IEnumerable<T> collection, Func<T, Task> taskFactory)
{
    var activeTasks = new List<Task>(maxDegreeOfConcurrency);
    foreach (var task in collection.Select(taskFactory))
    {
        activeTasks.Add(task);
        if (activeTasks.Count == maxDegreeOfConcurrency)
        {
            await Task.WhenAny(activeTasks.ToArray());
            //observe exceptions here
            activeTasks.RemoveAll(t => t.IsCompleted); 
        }
    }
    await Task.WhenAll(activeTasks.ToArray()).ContinueWith(t => 
    {
        //observe exceptions in a manner consistent with the above   
    });
}

The ToArray() calls can be optimized by using an array instead of a list and replacing completed tasks, but I doubt it would make much of a difference in most scenarios. Sample usage per the OP's question:

RunWithMaxDegreeOfConcurrency(10, ids, async i =>
{
    ICustomerRepo repo = new CustomerRepo();
    var cust = await repo.GetCustomer(i);
    customers.Add(cust);
});

EDIT Fellow SO user and TPL wiz Eli Arbel pointed me to a related article from Stephen Toub. As usual, his implementation is both elegant and efficient:

public static Task ForEachAsync<T>(
      this IEnumerable<T> source, int dop, Func<T, Task> body) 
{ 
    return Task.WhenAll( 
        from partition in Partitioner.Create(source).GetPartitions(dop) 
        select Task.Run(async delegate { 
            using (partition) 
                while (partition.MoveNext()) 
                    await body(partition.Current).ContinueWith(t => 
                          {
                              //observe exceptions
                          });

        })); 
}
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This should be pretty efficient, and easier than getting the whole TPL Dataflow working:

public static async Task<IList<TResult>> SelectAsync<TSource, TResult>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, Task<TResult>> selector, int maxDegreesOfParallelism = 4)
{
    var results = new List<TResult>();

    var activeTasks = new HashSet<Task<TResult>>();
    foreach (var item in source)
    {
        activeTasks.Add(selector(item));
        if (activeTasks.Count >= maxDegreesOfParallelism)
        {
            var completed = await Task.WhenAny(activeTasks);
            activeTasks.Remove(completed);
            results.Add(completed.Result);
        }
    }

    results.AddRange(await Task.WhenAll(activeTasks));
    return results;
}

You would use it like this:

var customers = await ids.SelectAsync(async i =>
{
    ICustomerRepo repo = new CustomerRepo();
    return await repo.GetCustomer(i);
});
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Shouldn't the usage example use await like: var customers = await ids.SelectAsync(async i => { ... });? –  Paccc Dec 14 '14 at 4:02
    
@pacc: You are correct. Fixed. –  John Gietzen Dec 14 '14 at 4:20

Wrap the Parallel.Foreach into a Task.Run() and instead of the await keyword use [yourasyncmethod].Result

(you need to do the Task.Run thing to not block the UI thread)

Something like this:

var yourForeachTask = Task.Run(() =>
        {
            Parallel.ForEach(ids, i =>
            {
                ICustomerRepo repo = new CustomerRepo();
                var cust = repo.GetCustomer(i).Result;
                customers.Add(cust);
            });
        });
await yourForeachTask;
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What's the problem with this? I'd have done it exactly like this. Let Parallel.ForEach do the parallel work, which blocks until all are done, and then push the whole thing to a background thread to have a responsive UI. Any issues with that? Maybe that's one sleeping thread too much, but it's short, readable code. –  LonelyPixel Jun 17 at 18:22

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