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I have a windows command line program running in C# that reads in log files on a server. The log files are space delimited (we're not able to change this) contain records that look similar to this:

74.57.205.141 - - [30/Mar/2012:00:03:04 +0000] "GET /7/961/148606/v1/00.akacast.akamaistream.net/00-radio-128" 200 1758815 "-" "iTunes/10.5.3 (Windows; Microsoft Windows 7 x64 "R2" Business Edition Service Pack 1 (Build 7601)) AppleWebKit/534.52.7"  102

Where the line starts to read "/iTunes is the beginning of the User Agent string. It's supposed to go all the way to the AppleWebKit/534.52.7 and end there. The problem is that for some user agent strings, a rogue quotation will be inserted into the user agent string. in the example, that rogue quotation is "R2".

It's not always R2 though, some other agent strings can throw in an extra quote as well so I can't just find and replace "R2" with R2.

The pattern I've been able to come up with in a valid string is that there are always 6 quotes, with every even numbered quote having a space after it.

1st Quote - Start string 2nd Quote - End string with space following 3rd Quote - Start string 4th Quote - End string with space following 5th Quote - Start string 6th Quote - End string with space following

An invalid string will always follow this pattern.

1st Quote - Start string 2nd Quote - End string with space following 3rd Quote - Start string 4th Quote - End string with space following 5th Quote - Start string 6th Quote - End string no space following 7th Quote - Start String 8th Quote - End string with space following

What I need is way to search the string to walk down the quote positions looking for that invalid pattern and removing the quotes from the 6th and 7th positions. I was thinking a good Regex might work but I'm not very good with them and haven't come up with anything that's worked yet, not to mention the regex isn't going to remove those quotes from the 6th and 7th positions.

EDIT

This might be too simplistic, but I was able to solve my particular issue by doing some index manipulation. I couldn't get the regex solutions to work for me unfortunately :(

Working code:

string str = "74.57.205.141 - - [30/Mar/2012:00:03:04 +0000] \"GET /7/961/148606/v1/00.akacast.akamaistream.net/00-radio-128\" 200 1758815 \"-\" \"iTunes/10.5.3 (Windows; Microsoft Windows 7 x64 \"R2\" Business Edition Service Pack 1 (Build 7601)) AppleWebKit/534.52.7\"  102";

int[] indexes = Enumerable.Range(0, str.Length).Where(x => str[x] == '"').ToArray();

            if (indexes.Length > 6)
            {
                //need to remove extra quotes from the 6th position and 7th position.
                //remove the 7th position first to prevent the index from changing on the quotes we need to remove.
                str = str.Remove(indexes[6], 1).Remove(indexes[5], 1);
            }
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2 Answers 2

How about this:

".*?".*?".*?".*?"(.*)"

It basically matches

[ignore beginning]
[First Quote Pair]
[AnythingInBetween]
[Second Quote Pair]
[AnythingInBetween]
[Quote]
GROUPS YOUR FINAL STRING HERE until
[LastQuote in the line]

Then, you can just do a remove of any inner quotes.

This works because it uses a non-greedy regex for the first two quote pairs, and then a greedy one for the final quote matching, so the final match will ignore all quotes until the final quote is reached.

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You can use a regex expression to detect a string with additional quotes:

(.+)(\s*".+"\s*)(.+)(\s*".+"\s*)(\s*".+"\s*)(.*)(\s*".+"\s*)(.+)

This will only match for strings like

UnquotedStart"QuotedText1" UnquotedText "QuotetText2" "QuotetText3" ROUGETEXT "QuotetText4"   UnquotetEnd

You can now reconstruct the correct string from the matching groups.

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