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Here's what I'm trying to achieve:

File 1 has contents something like this:

.

.

.

get_time file 10 -max 5 -min 0 abcde

get_time file 9 -max 5 -min 0 abfdf

get_time file 9 -max 5 -avg 3 -min 0 xyyxx

get_time file 10 -max 5 -min 0 abcxx

.

.

.

Meanwhile file 2 just contains:

abcde 8

abfdf 8.5

xyyxx 7.5

abcxx 9

.

.

.

What I need is a file 3 that prints out exactly whats there in file 1, except replace the value in column 3 correspondingly.

So the output should look like:

.

.

.

get_time file 8 -max 5 -min 0 abcde

get_time file 8.5 -max 5 -min 0 abfdf

get_time file 7.5 -max 5 -avg 3 -min 0 xyyxx

get_time file 9 -max 5 -min 0 abcxx

.

.

.

Note: File 1 contains a lot of other stuff that don't start with "get_time" before and after it. They're noted as dots in the example above.

Thanks for your help!

Edit: Thanks! Quick follow-up. Another similar file has something like this instead:

get_time file123 tmp 10 -max 5 -min 0 abcde 

get_time file foo 9 -max 5 -min 0 abfdf 

get_time file43 bar 9 -max 5 -avg 3 -min 0 xyyxx 

How would you modify your script? Thanks again

share|improve this question
    
See the update to my post. If the numbers you want to substitute immediately precede -max, then the change I suggested there will work fine. –  Chris Charley Jul 19 '12 at 22:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Read file 2 into a hash or dictionary, where the key is the 5-letter tag.

Read file 1 one line at a time, replacing the value in the third column with the value found in the hash or dictionary based on the tag that appears at the end of the line.


Perl

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use English qw( -no_match_vars );

my %times;

$OFS = " ";

open my $file, "<", "file2" or die "Failed to open file2 ($!)";
while (<$file>)
{
    my($key,$value) = split;
    $times{$key} = $value;
}
close $file;

while (<>)
{
    if (/^get_time file/)
    {
        my(@words) = split;
        my($keycol) = $words[$#words];
        $words[2] = $times{$keycol} if defined $times{$keycol};
        print @words, "\n";
        next;
    }
    print;
}

I make no claims that it is superlative Perl; it does seem to work given:

file1

.X1X.
.X2X.
.X3X.
get_time file 10 -max 5 -min 0 abcde
get_time file 9 -max 5 -min 0 abfdf
get_time file 9 -max 5 -avg 3 -min 0 xyyxx
get_time file 10 -max 5 -min 0 abcxx
.X4X.
.X5X.
.X6X.

file2

abcde 8
abfdf 8.5
xyyxx 7.5
abcxx 9

output

.X1X.
.X2X.
.X3X.
get_time file 8 -max 5 -min 0 abcde 
get_time file 8.5 -max 5 -min 0 abfdf 
get_time file 7.5 -max 5 -avg 3 -min 0 xyyxx 
get_time file 9 -max 5 -min 0 abcxx 
.X4X.
.X5X.
.X6X.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help! –  user1497417 Jul 19 '12 at 16:44

I thought I'd post a superlative Perl solution.    ;-)

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Inline::Files;

my %data = map split, <FILE2>;

while (<FILE1>) {
    if (my ($key) = /^get_time file .+ (\w+)$/) {
        s/\d+/$data{$key}/ if exists $data{$key};
    }
    print;
}

__FILE2__
abcde 8
abfdf 8.5
xyyxx 7.5
abcxx 9
__FILE1__
.X1X.
.X2X.
.X3X.
get_time file 10 -max 5 -min 0 abcde
get_time file 9 -max 5 -min 0 abfdf
get_time file 9 -max 5 -avg 3 -min 0 xyyxx
get_time file 10 -max 5 -min 0 abcxx
.X4X.
.X5X.
.X6X.

Results the same as Jonathan's solution.

Update: user1497417 asked how to parse some formats different from the ones he wanted changed in his first post. Those 3 lines are:

get_time file123 tmp 10 -max 5 -min 0 abcde
get_time file foo 9 -max 5 -min 0 abfdf
get_time file43 bar 9 -max 5 -avg 3 -min 0 xyyxx 

If any of those lines need a substitution performed, the script would have to know how to find the number that needs replaced (or not). Maybe changing the substitution line to:

s/\d+(?= -max)/$data{$key}/ if exists $data{$key};

This still doesn't account for fractions, but the poster hasn't said whether they occur and if so, should they be replaced too. So, I'm leaving it alone for now

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Quick follow-up. Another similar file has something like this instead: get_time file123 tmp 10 -max 5 -min 0 abcde get_time file foo 9 -max 5 -min 0 abfdf get_time file43 bar 9 -max 5 -avg 3 -min 0 xyyxx How would you modify your script? Thanks again –  user1497417 Jul 19 '12 at 17:15
    
Nice. Given that the replacement can include fractions, the input might also include fractions, in which case the /\d+/ needs to be more like /d+(?:\.\d*)?/, I think. AFAICS from the Perl documentation, the Inline::Files module is not in the core of Perl, which might be a minor issue for some people. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 19 '12 at 18:19
    
@ Jonathan Leffler I had not considered fractions in the input. Good of you to notice. Used Inline::Files to avoid creating files to read from. Would not use it except for demo purposes. –  Chris Charley Jul 19 '12 at 18:25
    
@user1497417 It is hard to see if it is on 1 or more lines in your sample line(s) (above). Perhaps you could post it by editing your original post, showing the line in quesiton –  Chris Charley Jul 19 '12 at 18:28
    
I like the compression you get. The map split, <$filehandle> technique is interesting, but the comma is a bit subtle; I'd probably use map { split } <$filehandle>; instead. The alternative way of viewing the substitute is simpler than splitting the line into words, doing the substitution of one word based on another word, and reassembling the output. I'm don't think there's a material difference between exists and defined in this context. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 19 '12 at 18:46

For the sake of completeness, here's a solution in Python 3:

with open("file2") as f:
    times = dict(line.split() for line in f)

with open("file1") as in_f, open("file3", "w") as out_f:
    for line in in_f:
        fields = line.split(" ")
        if fields[0] == "get_time":
            fields[2] = times.get(fields[7], fields[2])
            line = " ".join(fields)

        out_f.write(line)
share|improve this answer

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