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I have a following divs defined in source:

<div id="container">
    <div id="right">Right</div>
    <div id="left">Left</div>
</div>​

I cannot really reorder them, so I have to play with CSS so that they appear on the page as follows:

+---------------------+
| container           |
| +-------+-------+   |
| | left  | right |   |
| +-------+-------+   |
+---------------------+

The challenge is that contents of #left div may be of arbitrary width and whatever the width is, I need the #right div to stick to the right border of #left div. Any ideas how to achieve that?

Any help appreciated!

Also, there is a small constraint: I need both of #left and #right align to the left of border of the #container div.

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Thanks a lot all for your help! –  Karol Jul 20 '12 at 8:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use float: right to move div#right and div#left to the correct sides. That should also align the right side of div#left to div#right.

#right, #left {
    float: right;
}

JS Fiddle Example

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Sounds interesting. Is there any way I can make this two together align to the left of the container div? –  Karol Jul 19 '12 at 16:35
    
@Karol Are you able to wrap div#right annd div#left in a wrapper div? If so, you could float that to the left. –  JSW189 Jul 19 '12 at 16:44

Try this:

#container{
    margin:10px 10px;
}

#left,#right {
    float:left;
    padding:0px;
    height:100px;
    background-color:#000000;
}
#right{
background-color:#f1f1f1;
}
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Better Answer

Allow #right to set edge of #left, while still giving flexibility to #left by using a trick with overflow: hidden (see fiddle):

#right {
    float: right;
}

#left {
    overflow: hidden; /* this causes non-floated `left` to behave different */
}

Original Answer

I would expand upon Rich and JSW189's answer as, I do not like the possibilities of just floating them right. If you can, do that, but then float the container left (see the fiddle), which requires that no width be set on container, else there is a problem again (see fiddle):

#container {
    float: left;
}

#right, #left {
    float: right;
}

Of course, there are applications where this will not be possible (like when you want width on the container.

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In your css, try floating them both to the right, like this:

#left,#right { float:right; }

Complete CSS

 #container { 
      background:#ddd; 
      width:200px; 
      height:100px; 
 }

 #left, #right { 
      float:right;  
 }

 #left { 
      width:30%; 
      background:green; 
 }

 #right { 
      width:70%; 
      background:blue; 
 }

Here's the example in jsFiddle

Aligning them both to the left

If your not using fixed percentage widths (or no widths at all), this will result in both div#left and div#right being floated to the right like so:

+---------------------------------+
| container                       |
|             +-------+-------+   |
|             | left  | right |   |
|             +-------+-------+   |
+---------------------------------+

If you would like to align them to the left, wrap them in a container div:

<div id="container-inner"> ... </div>

And apply this css:

#container-inner { float:left; }

Resulting in:

+---------------------------------+
| container                       |
| +-------+-------+               |
| | left  | right |               |
| +-------+-------+               |
+---------------------------------+

Hope that helps

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