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on my site I allow people to buy subscriptions to my site in bulk(I call them vouchers). Once they have these vouchers, they give them to whoever and they enter that code into their account to upgrade them.

Right now I am thinking of doing 4 alphanumeric code(upper case, lower case and digits) and will have something like this

var chars = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789";
var stringChars = new char[4];
var random = new Random();

for (int i = 0; i < stringChars.Length; i++)
{
    stringChars[i] = chars[random.Next(chars.Length)];
}

var finalString = new String(stringChars);

For now I think that will give me more than enough combinations and if I ever do run out I can always up the length of the code. I want to keep it short because I don't want the user to have to type in huge as numbers.

I also don't have the time to make a more elegant solution maybe were they click a link or something in their email and it activates their account and of course this would cut down on someone trying to randomly guess a voucher number.

These are things I would deal with if the site every becomes more popular.

I am wondering though how can I handle the possible duplicate generation of the same voucher. My first thought was to check the database each time a voucher is created and if it exists then make a new one.

However that seems like it could be slow. So I thought also maybe getting all the keys first and store them in memory and they check there but if the list keeps growing I might run into out of memory exceptions and all that great stuff.

So does anyone have any ideas? Or am I stuck doing one of the 2 method I listed above?

I am using nhibernate, asp.net mvc and C#.

Edit

 static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<string> hold = new List<string>();
            for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
            {
                HashAlgorithm sha = new SHA1CryptoServiceProvider();
                byte[] result = sha.ComputeHash(BitConverter.GetBytes(i));
                string hex = null;

                foreach (byte x in result)
                {
                    hex += String.Format("{0:x2}", x);
                }

                hold.Add(hex.Substring(0,3));

                Console.WriteLine(hex.Substring(0, 4));
            }


             Console.WriteLine("Number of Distinct values {0}", hold.Distinct().Count());
        }

above is my attempt to try to use hashing. However I think I am missing something as it seems to have quite a bit more duplicates then expected.

Edit 2

I think I added what I was missing but not sure if this is exactly what he meant. I am also not sure what to do in a situation when I moved it as far as I can move it(my has seems to give me a length of 40 places I can move it).

  static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int subStringLength = 4;
            List<string> hold = new List<string>();
            for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
            {
                SHA1CryptoServiceProvider sha = new SHA1CryptoServiceProvider();
                byte[] result = sha.ComputeHash(BitConverter.GetBytes(i));
                string hex = null;

                foreach (byte x in result)
                {
                    hex += String.Format("{0:x2}", x);
                }

                int startingPositon = 0;
                string possibleVoucherCode = hex.Substring(startingPositon,subStringLength);

                string voucherCode = Move(subStringLength, hold, hex, startingPositon, possibleVoucherCode);
                hold.Add(voucherCode);
            }


             Console.WriteLine("Number of Distinct values {0}", hold.Distinct().Count());
        }

    private static string Move(int subStringLength, List<string> hold, string hex, int startingPositon, string possibleVoucherCode)
    {
        if (hold.Contains(possibleVoucherCode))
        {
            int newPosition = startingPositon + 1;
            if (newPosition <= hex.Length)
            {
                if ((newPosition + subStringLength) > hex.Length)
                {
                    possibleVoucherCode = hex.Substring(newPosition, subStringLength);
                    return Move(subStringLength, hold, hex, newPosition, possibleVoucherCode);
                }
                // return something
                return "0";
            }
            else
            {
                // return something
                return "0";
            }
        }
        else
        {
           return possibleVoucherCode;
        }

    }
}
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1  
>However that seems like it could be slow.< Have you TRIED that method of checking a duplicate first? You might be surprised. As that is the simplest way to prevent duplicates –  hometoast Jul 24 '12 at 17:48
    
What you mean checking a duplicate first? What method are you saying might be slow the hash way or my original posted way? –  chobo2 Jul 25 '12 at 16:45
    
You were concerned that generating an ID then checking for a duplicate "seems like it could be slow". I propose you just try that method and see how it performs. You're already opening a connection to the database for other reasons. A quick select really shouldn't slow things down so much. –  hometoast Jul 25 '12 at 16:48
    
I probably will end up doing a select after each voucher is created but I was hoping to find a solution that won't require me coming back to fix it one day. I mean if I need to generate 10,000 vouchers at one time that is going to suck doing 10,000 selects and as the more vouchers I add the more records it has to check again the slower it will get. This is why the hash way seemed interesting but I found a couple problems with it and not sure how to correct. –  chobo2 Jul 25 '12 at 17:37
    
What database server are you using? SQL Server 2008 R2? –  Daniel Schilling Jul 25 '12 at 21:33
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is going to be slow because you want to generate the vouchers randomly and then check the database for every generated code.

I would create a table vouchers with an id, the code and an is_used column. I would fill that table once with enough random codes. Since this can be done in a separate process, the performance won't be such a big problem. Let it run in the evening and the next day you get a fully filled vouchers-table.

If you want to prevent generating duplicate vouchers, that won't be a problem. You can generate them anyway and put them either in a System.Collections.Generic.HashSet (which prevents adding duplicates without throwing an exception) or call the Linq-method Distinct(), before adding them to that vouchers table.

share|improve this answer
    
Well I already have a vouchers table and a column is_used(so I know if a person used the voucher already). I am not sure what you really mean by filling the table with enough random codes. Is your solution generate 1000 vouchers codes then when I need to fill an order find x amount needed and then hook them up? –  chobo2 Jul 25 '12 at 16:45
    
By looking at your question, I don't think 1000 will be enough, but yes (and set is_used to false of course). You probably want to give out those vouchers fast and without problems, so any problems you can get (duplicate codes, performance etc) can best be avoided. And by generating them beforehand will prevent any of those problems. If you get to the end of your last code, you can always add new ones to that table and the rest of your system keeps working. –  Jeroen Jul 25 '12 at 17:29
    
Well I don't want to store too many unnecessary codes(like I don't want to waste space to store 10,000 codes knowing it might be 20 years till they all get used). I also still not sure how this will get by the duplicate problem. Are you saying that basically use my code but run it at night and just have it check for duplicates(even if it is slow) as it does not matter since it is running at a time when I don't need them instead of on the fly? –  chobo2 Jul 25 '12 at 17:34
    
Yes. Getting rid of those duplicates can be done as I described in the last paragraph, by putting them in a HashSet or by using the Linq method Distinct(). Both will result in a collection of unique codes. You said those codes will be 4 characters long. That means less than 40kb of disk space. Your database will be able to handle that easily. Also querying 10000 records is easy for a database. That is what they are made for. –  Jeroen Jul 25 '12 at 17:53
    
ah. I am wondering though say I want to generate 10,000 and I already reached the max combination of 4 characters(I decided to only do a-z0-9] what gives me 1,679,616 combinations. What is a good way to stop the loop that is generating the codes as eventually this would just case a infinite loop as I telling the loop to not stop till it makes me all the codes I need. At this point I would just up the code by a character but would still need it to stop. –  chobo2 Jul 25 '12 at 17:57
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If you insist on short codes:

Use a GUID as a primary key, generate one random number. How you might want to translate this in to alpha-num is up to you.

Use the last byte or two of the guid and the random number. 1234-684687 This should make it slightly less easy to bruteforce coupons. And handle any (rare) collisions with an exception.

Easy way to shorten an int, change it's base (from 10 to 62). (in VB, and this is old code) This yields "2lkCB1" when given Int32.MaxValue

''//given intValue as your random integer
Dim result As String = String.Empty
Dim digits as String = "0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
Dim x As Integer
While (intValue > 0)
   x = intValue Mod digits.Length
   result = digits(x) & result 
   intValue = intValue - x
   intValue = intValue \ digits.Length
End While
Return result

But now we're already answering more than one question.

share|improve this answer
    
Ya I heard something about short codes but was not sure how it works. So what I make guid then convert it to a byte aray and take the last 2 bites? Make a random number(how big?) and put it together? I am trying to make codes right now short as possible and I am not worried about bruteforce right now as site is not that popular to worry about it at this time. What is the collision ration with this solution? –  chobo2 Jul 25 '12 at 18:23
    
If you have a resource that is valuable to you (these codes for subscriptions), you should always worry about someone stealing them (via bruteforce) –  hometoast Jul 25 '12 at 18:38
    
And I want to make clear, I make no claim that this answer solves any sort of issues with 'guess-ability' of your codes. –  hometoast Jul 25 '12 at 18:40
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A possible solution for you is like this:
Find the maximum ID of a voucher (an integer). Then, run any hash function on it, take the first 32 bits and convert to the string you want to show the user (or use a 32bit hash function such as Jenkins hash function). This will probably work, hash collisions are pretty rare. But this solution is very similar to yours, in the point of randomness.

You could run a test which finds the first 10 or 100 collisions (this should be enough for you) and forces the algorithm to "skip" them and use a different starting value. Then, you don't need to check the database at all (well, at least until you reach about 4294967296 vouchers...)

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Sorry I am not following. So I should look for biggest voucher number that was created in the database and then run a hash function on it and then take make it into a string and use that as the voucher code? –  chobo2 Jul 19 '12 at 17:15
    
I assume you have an ID column in your table. Take the max value of ID and add one. This way you will get 1,2,3... for the 'input' of the hashes. Also, you can run a XOR on the output for additional security. –  Quantic Programming Jul 19 '12 at 17:45
    
Yes I did make that one an id column(sometime I make the guid as I find it works better with nhibernate). Ok so I have id of 1 now I add one to give me 2. Then I take 2 and put it through a hash function(any .net one I should use). And this will give me a 4 alpahnumeric code? –  chobo2 Jul 19 '12 at 19:24
    
See my update. I am not sure if this is what you mean as I getting quite a bit of collisions so I must have missed something. –  chobo2 Jul 19 '12 at 19:52
    
so I ran my new version(I had to make a few simple changes as it kept moving the to the next number till I ran out of numbers to move to and crashed). With my test I got Number of Distinct values 65,537.00 / 1,000,000.00 –  chobo2 Jul 19 '12 at 20:43
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how about utilizing nHibernate's HiLo algorithm?
Here is an example on how you can get the next value (without DB access).

share|improve this answer
    
I guess this could be a possibility but I really don't want to setup a hi-lo table. If I remember correctly too it will use ranges and I could burn through those ranges quite fast. For instance I might have someone buy 2 vouchers and another time someone buy 1000. What range should I make it then? Plus won't I lose alpha characters as well? –  chobo2 Jul 19 '12 at 19:55
    
It all depends how you increment your initial 'low'. If you start with, say, 1000, then best-case scenario you'll go 1000 ids before going to the db again. About alpha characters- yeah, you're right. If you want, you may want to build your own ID generator (nhforge.org/wikis/howtonh/…) –  sJhonny Jul 19 '12 at 20:38
    
How long does it keep those 1000 ids memory before? You say best-case? What is worst case? Plus what happens if I to now have range to 5000. As I foresaw this I would have a box that would set the length of the voucher. If I thought I was getting low on vouchers I might but that up to 5 places instead of 4. –  chobo2 Jul 19 '12 at 21:07
    
I would suggest reading a bit about HiLo and how it works, and then you'd be able to answer your questions –  sJhonny Jul 20 '12 at 7:56
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For a bulk data operation like this, I would recommend not using NHibernate and just doing straight ADO.NET.

Batch Check

Since you anticipate generating big batches of codes at once, you should batch multiple code checks into a single round-trip to the database. If you're using SQL Server 2008 or higher, you could do this using table-valued parameters, checking a whole list of codes at once.

SELECT DISTINCT b.Code
FROM @batch b
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT v.Code
    FROM dbo.Voucher v
    WHERE v.Code = b.Code
);

Concurrency

Now, what about concurrency issues? What if two users generate the same code at roughly the same time? Or simply in-between the time when we check the code for uniqueness and when we insert it into the Voucher table?

We can take care of that by modifying the query as follows:

DECLARE @batchid uniqueidentifier;
SET @batchid = NEWID();

INSERT INTO dbo.Voucher (Code, BatchId)
SELECT DISTINCT b.Code, @batchid
FROM @batch b
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT Code
    FROM dbo.Voucher v
    WHERE b.Code = v.Code
);

SELECT Code
FROM dbo.Voucher
WHERE BatchId = @batchid;

Executing via .NET

Assuming that you have defined the following table-valued user type...

CREATE TYPE dbo.VoucherCodeList AS TABLE (
    Code nvarchar(8) COLLATE SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CS_AS NOT NULL
    /* !!! Remember to specify the collation on your Voucher.Code column too, since you want upper and lower-case codes. */
);

... you could execute this query via .NET code like this:

public ICollection<string> GenerateCodes(int numberOfCodes)
{
    var result = new List<string>(numberOfCodes);

    while (result.Count < numberOfCodes)
    {
        var batchSize = Math.Min(_batchSize, numberOfCodes - result.Count);
        var batch = Enumerable.Range(0, batchSize)
            .Select(x => GenerateRandomCode());
        var oldResultCount = result.Count;

        result.AddRange(FilterAndSecureBatch(batch));

        var filteredBatchSize = result.Count - oldResultCount;
        var collisionRatio = ((double)batchSize - filteredBatchSize) / batchSize;

        // Automatically increment length of random codes if collisions begin happening too frequently
        if (collisionRatio > _collisionThreshold)
            CodeLength++;
    }

    return result;
}

private IEnumerable<string> FilterAndSecureBatch(IEnumerable<string> batch)
{
    using (var command = _connection.CreateCommand())
    {
        command.CommandText = _sqlQuery; // the concurrency-safe query listed above

        var metaData = new[] { new SqlMetaData("Code", SqlDbType.NVarChar, 8) };
        var param = command.Parameters.Add("@batch", SqlDbType.Structured);
        param.TypeName = "dbo.VoucherCodeList";
        param.Value = batch.Select(x =>
        {
            var record = new SqlDataRecord(metaData);
            record.SetString(0, x);
            return record;
        });

        using (var reader = command.ExecuteReader())
            while (reader.Read())
                yield return reader.GetString(0);
    }
}

Performance

After implementing all of this (and moving the command and parameter creation out of the loop so it would be re-used between batches), I was able to insert 10,000 codes using a batch size of 500 consistently in approx. 0.5 to 2 seconds, or 5 to 20 codes per millisecond.

Code Density / Collisions / Guessability

The _collisionThreshold field limits the density of your codes. It's a value between 0 and 1. Actually, it must be less than 1 or else you would wind up in an infinite loop when the 4 digit codes were exhausted (probably should add an assertion for this in code). I would recommend never turning it above 0.5 for performance reasons. More than 50% collisions would mean it's spending more time testing already-used codes than actually generating new ones.

Keeping the collision threshold low is how you would control how hard-to-guess your codes are. Setting _collisionThreshold to 0.01 would generate codes such that there's approximately a 1% chance of someone guessing a code.

If collisions occur too frequently, CodeLength (which is used by the GenerateRandomCode() method) will be incremented. This value needs to be persisted somewhere. After executing GenerateCodes(), check CodeLength to see if it has changed and then save the new value.

Source Code

The full code is available here: https://gist.github.com/3217856. I am the author of this code, and am releasing it under the MIT license. I had fun with this little challenge, and also got to learn how to pass a table-valued parameter to an inline parametrized query. I hadn't ever done that before. I've only ever passed them to full-fledged stored procedures.

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