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This works:

    std::thread t = std::thread(printf, "%d", 1);

This doesn't work:

t2 = std::thread(my_thread_func , std::ref(context));

OR

std::thread t1 = std::thread(my_thread_func , context_add);

my_thread_func definition :

int my_thread_func(long long *context_add)

context is some struct .. and I'm trying to do 'pass by reference'

Error:

function call missing argument list;

error C2661: 'std::thread::thread' : no overloaded function takes 2 arguments

>>> EDIT <<<

Sorry for confusion ... actually I'm defining my_thread_func in public of MainPage, so I cannot use native type hence I thought worth trying for long and give it address.

/* test data types, context for thread function, in .cpp (not in namespace) */
typedef struct _test_context
{
    HANDLE hHandle;
    unsigned int flag;
}test_context_t;

test_context_t *context;
//Do something with its member
context_add = (long long *)context;
std::thread t2 = std::thread(sem_waiting_thread, context_add);

ERROR:

error C3867: 'App1::MainPage::my_thread_func': function call missing argument list; use '&App1::MainPage::my_thread_func' to create a pointer to member
error C2661: 'std::thread::thread' : no overloaded function takes 2 arguments

my namespace looks like:

namespace App1
{
    public ref class MainPage sealed
    {
   public:
    MainPage();
       public:
           MainPage();
           int my_thread_func(long long cotext);
      ..
    };
}

<<<< EDIT 2 >>> I'm curious now .. this simple one also doesn't work!

void f1(int n)
{
    for(int i=0; i<5; ++i) {
        // Print n
        std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(10));
    }
} 
.
.
.

int n=0;
std::thread t2(f1, n+1); (//This didn't work,same error!)

.
.
.
but this worked!
std::thread t2;
.
.
.
t2= std::thread (f1, n+1);

Trying from here: http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/thread/thread/thread

share|improve this question
1  
The question is a bit confusing... context is some struct, but in the declaration it is a pointer to a long long... can you post the actual declaration of the function and the type that you want to pass in? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 19 '12 at 17:20
1  
You should show a complete example that, with the not-working std::thread constructor line commented out, compiles. Then someone can show you how to write that line properly. Otherwise, we have to guess. That being said, I think betabandido did manage to answer successfully in this case—but most of us aren't as psychic as him. –  abarnert Jul 19 '12 at 17:22
    
What do you mean by "I cannot use native type"? Why are you casting the context to a long long? –  betabandido Jul 19 '12 at 17:33
1  
That should work, but I am not using Visual-C++. I have heard that it has many problems with C++11. BTW, what is public ref class MainPage sealed? That is not valid C++. I believe you should get yourself a good C++ book and have a look at it. It will help you a lot. –  betabandido Jul 19 '12 at 18:15
1  
On top of all the other problems, you've defined my_thread_func as a (non-static) member function, but you're trying to use it as a free function. That's exactly what C3867 is telling you, and it evens gives you the first half of the solution. (The second half is that you have to call it with this->*, which thread::thread isn't going to do—in fact, couldn't do, because you haven't given it a this pointer—so you're going to need to use std::function or std::bind. Or, more simply, if my_thread_func doesn't need access to this, make it a static or free function.) –  abarnert Jul 19 '12 at 18:37

1 Answer 1

It would be better to define your function as:

int my_thread_func(context& ctx);

Then you would be able to pass a reference to a context. If the function is not supposed to modify the context then it is better to use:

int my_thread_func(const context& ctx);

Then you can create the thread like:

test_context_t context;
/* ... */
std::thread t = std::thread(my_thread_func , std::ref(context));

From your code it seems you have a pointer to a context. You might want to reconsider that and just use an object instance as I do above. If the context is passed to a function as a pointer you might want to change that pointer to a reference too. But if that is not possible (or desirable) then you can still create the thread by doing:

test_context_t* context;
/* ... */
std::thread t = std::thread(my_thread_func , std::ref(*context));

Alternatively, you can just use plain pointers:

int my_thread_func(context* ctx); // notice the different function's signature

test_context_t* context;
/* ... */
std::thread t = std::thread(my_thread_func , context);
share|improve this answer
    
It looks like he already tried passing a context*, and it would have worked if he had remembered to pass &mycontext instead of mycontext. So, there might be a more direct/minimal solution. But even so, using a reference is probably better, so +1. –  abarnert Jul 19 '12 at 17:20
    
Indeed. Probably the OP was trying all the possible ways to pass the context (reference, pointer). But since the first statement uses std::ref I assumed that was the OP's preference :) –  betabandido Jul 19 '12 at 17:26

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