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I have a linq query, the results of which I iterate over in a foreach loop.

The first is a query which grabs a collection of controls from a table layout panel, I then iterate over the collection and remove the controls from the tableLayoutPanel thus:

var AllItems = (from Item in this.tableLayoutPanel1.Controls.OfType<ItemControl>()
                select Item);

foreach (ItemControl item in AllItems)
{
    Trace.WriteLine("Removing " + item.ToString());
    this.tableLayoutPanel1.Controls.Remove(item);
    item.Dispose();
}

The above does not do as I expected (i.e. Throw an error), it removes only half the controls (the ODD numbered ones) it appears that on each iteration the AllItems reduces it's self, and though the underlying collection is being modified no error is thrown.

If I do simmilar with an array of strings:

        string[] strs = { "d", "c", "A", "b" };
        List<string> stringList = strs.ToList();

        var allitems = from letter in stringList
                       select letter;

        foreach (string let in allitems)
        {
            stringList.Remove(let);

        }

This time Visual studio throws an error (as expected) complaining that the underlying collection has changed.

Why does the first example not blow up too?

There is something about Iterators/IEnumerable that I am not understanding here and I wonder if someone could help me understand what is going on under the hood with linq and foreach.

(I am aware that I can cure both issues by AllItems.ToList(); before I iterate, but would like to understand why the second example throws an error and the first does not)

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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Why does the first example not blow up too?

The IEnumerator implementation within tableLayoutPanel1.Controls isn't performing the proper checks to see if the collection has been modified. This doesn't mean that it's a safe operation (as the results aren't appropriate), but rather that the class wasn't implemented in a way that raises an exception (as it probably should).

The exception that is raised when you enumerate through a List<T> and remove an item is actually raised by the List<T>.Enumerator type, and is not a "general purpose" language feature.

Note that this is a nice feature of the List<T>.Enumerator type, as the IEnumerator<T> documentation explicitly states:

An enumerator remains valid as long as the collection remains unchanged. If changes are made to the collection, such as adding, modifying, or deleting elements, the enumerator is irrecoverably invalidated and its behavior is undefined.

While there is no contract requiring an exception to be thrown, it's beneficial for implementations to do so when you're entering the realm of "undefined behavior."

In this case, the TableLayoutControlCollection class enumerator implementation is not performing the extra checks, so you're seeing what happens when you use a feature where the "behavior is undefined." (In this case, it's removing every other control.)

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Is the reason for this issue not related to the fact that Enumerable.OfType is implemented by using deferred execution, hence the sequence always changes on every enumeration? –  Tim Schmelter Jul 19 '12 at 17:43
2  
@TimSchmelter Well, OfType<T> just enumerates through using the source enumerator directly - while it's not doing checking, the same thing would happen if you enumerated the objects, and put the check inside the loop. The underlying enumerator isn't performing a check for whether the control collection is modified. –  Reed Copsey Jul 19 '12 at 17:47
    
@TimSchmelter: I suspect all LINQ operations could be removed from the original post code, and it would behave exactly the same way. As Reed says, this is a result of the enumerator implementation. OfType has nothing to do with it. –  StriplingWarrior Jul 19 '12 at 17:51
    
That's awesome dude, thanks. so in my 1st case is the linq expression being re-evaluated on every iteration of the foreach loop? or is linq getting the IEnumerator from the tablelayoutpanel.controls collection? –  John Jul 19 '12 at 19:59
    
@John It's not being re-evaluated. OfType<T> gets the IEnumerator from tableLayoutPanel.Controls, and wraps it in it's own enumerator, which is then enumerated once during your foreach loop. –  Reed Copsey Jul 19 '12 at 22:12
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so in my 1st case is the linq expression being re-evaluated on every iteration of the foreach loop? or is linq getting the IEnumerator from the tablelayoutpanel.controls collection?

Think of it as if it were happening like this which is what is happening in both your cases:

    foreach (string l in (from letter in stringList select letter)) 
    { 
        stringList.Remove(l); 
    } 

The above pseudo code illustrates that as you try to remove an item you are essentially in the middle of an enumeration of the stringList collection. What Reed is saying is that in the second case the enumerator of the stringList is making sure nobody is messing with it while it's in the middle of enumerating.

He's saying that in the case with your controls, the controls enumerator is happily going along and not checking to see if anybody is monkeying around with its data.

For completeness, compare these two examples:

This query for letters will be revaluated each time letters is touched which includes the time we are in the foreach loop:

    IEnumerable<string> letters = from letter in stringList select letter);

    // everytime we hit this we're going to hit the stringList collection
    foreach (string l in letters) 
    { 
        stringList.Remove(l); 
    } 

This query uses the ToList() which immediately fills in the letters and we will no longer touch the stringList collection in the foreach loop.

    List<string> letters = (from letter in stringList select letter).ToList()

    // because we ran ToList(), we will no longer enumerate stringList
    foreach (string l in letters) 
    { 
        stringList.Remove(l); 
    } 
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Thank you Brad. I got it now. @everyone who responded: Thank you, this has really cleared this subject up in my mind. You guy's rock! –  John Jul 19 '12 at 20:56
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Try this:

var AllItems = (from Item in this.tableLayoutPanel1.Controls.OfType<ItemControl>() 
                select Item);  


  int totalCount = AllItems .Count;
   for (int i = 0; i < totalCount; i++)
       {
           AllItems .RemoveAt(0);
        }
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