Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a while loop and all it does is a method call. I have a timer on the outside of the loop and another timer that incrementally adds up the time the method call takes inside the loop. The outer time takes about 17 seconds and the total on the inner timer is 40 ms. The loop is executing 50,000 times. Here is an example of the code:

long InnerTime = 0;
long OutterTime = 0;
Stopw1.Start();
int count = 1;
while (count <= TestCollection.Count) {
    Stopw2.Start();
    Medthod1();
    Stopw2.Stop();
    InnerTime = InnerTime + Stopw2.ElapsedMilliseconds;
    Stopw2.Reset();
    count++;
}
Stopw1.Stop();
OutterTime = Stopw1.ElapsedMilliseconds;
Stopw1.Reset();

Any help would be much appreciated. Massimo

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried removing the inner loop timing code and seeing if it speeds up? –  Thom Smith Jul 19 '12 at 17:26
    
Code seems to be just fine, except the "Method1", which we dont know what it does. Else, concerning timer seems all ok! –  Mitja Bonca Jul 19 '12 at 17:28
1  
What is TestCollection - is it a method, a variable/property or what? Try replacing TestCollection.Count with a constant (obviously one low enough not to fall over). –  Jon Egerton Jul 19 '12 at 17:31
1  
Try doing int countLimit = TestCollection.Count outside the loop and using countLimit in your condition. It may be a pretty expensive evaluation if the collection is highly dynamic. –  JamieSee Jul 19 '12 at 17:32
3  
If TestCollection is an instance of Collection<T> or List<T>, Count is a O(1) operation. Unless it's some kind of inefficient custom class, it shouldn't be causing the problem. –  Tim Copenhaver Jul 19 '12 at 17:35

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You are comparing apples and oranges. Your outer timer measures the total time taken. Your inner timer measures the number of whole milliseconds taken by the call to Method1.

The ElapsedMilliseconds property "represents elapsed time rounded down to the nearest whole millisecond value." So, you are rounding down to the nearest millisecond about 50,000 times.

If your call to Method1 takes, on average, less than 1ms, then most of the time, the `ElapsedMilliseconds' property will return 0 and your inner count will be much, much less than the actual time. In fact, your method takes about 0.3ms on average, so you're lucky even to get it to go over 1ms 40 times.

Use the Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds or ElapsedTicks property instead of ElapsedMilliseconds. One millisecond is equivalent to 10,000 ticks.

share|improve this answer
    
Using the ElapsedTicks showed a much more accurate reflection of the time.There turned out to only be a 72 ms time difference.Thank you Jeffrey –  Massimo Guerrera Jul 20 '12 at 7:02

What is this doing: TestCollection.Count ?

I suspect your 17 seconds are being spent counting your 50,000 items over and over again.

share|improve this answer
    
You think it is counting faculty of 50,000 times? Would be interesting what's the type of TestCollection. –  Mare Infinitus Jul 19 '12 at 17:42
    
You are probably thinking of the Linq Count() expression and not the ICollection.Count property. –  scottm Jul 19 '12 at 17:49

To add to what the others have already said, in general the C# compiler must re-evaluate any property, including

TestCollection.Count

for every single loop iteration. The property's value could change from iteration to iteration.

Assigning the value to a local variable removes the compiler's need to re-evaluate for every loop iteration.

The one exception that I'm aware of is for Array.Length, which benefits from an optimization specifically for arrays. This is referred to as Array Bounds Check Elimination.

share|improve this answer
1  
ICollection.Count usually just returns a private field value. Although the value could change and cause issues, I don't think 'reevaluating the property' is the problem. –  scottm Jul 19 '12 at 17:53
    
Sure, I think the real issue is that he's not measuring properly as @Jeffrey pointed out. Just added this for completeness. Sometimes property evaluation is expensive relative to the loop body (just not here). –  Eric J. Jul 19 '12 at 19:36

Try changing this:

while (count <= TestCollection.Count) {
...
}

to this:

int total = TestCollection.Count;
while (count <= total) {
...
}
share|improve this answer

To have a correct measurement of the time that your calls take, you should use the Ticks

Please try the following:

long InnerTime = 0;
long OutterTime = 0;

Stopwatch Stopw1 = new Stopwatch();
Stopwatch Stopw2 = new Stopwatch();

Stopw1.Start();
int count = 1;
int run = TestCollection.Count;
while (count <= run) {
    Stopw2.Start();
    Medthod1();
    Stopw2.Stop();
    InnerTime = InnerTime + Stopw2.ElapsedTicks;
    Stopw2.Reset();
    count++;
}
Stopw1.Stop();
OutterTime = Stopw1.ElapsedTicks;
Stopw1.Reset();
share|improve this answer

You should not measure such a tiny method individually. But if you really want to, try this:

long innertime = 0;

while (count <= TestCollection.Count) 
{     
    innertime -= Stopw2.GetTimestamp();
    Medthod1();
    innertime += Stopw2.GetTimestamp();
    count++; 
} 

Console.WriteLine("{0} ms", innertime * 1000.0 / Stopw2.Frequency);
share|improve this answer

Since you started with int count = 1;, if your loop executes 50,000 times it implies that the value of TestCollection.Count is 50,000. So your code needs to calculate this value 50,000 of TestCollection.Count 50,000 times, once per entering the loop;
So, depending on what the Medthod1() really does, taking time might be normal. Store the value of TestCollection.Count in a variable and compare the loop counter against that.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.