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The haskell code below compiles, Ok.

data Point = Point Float Float  
data Radius = Radius Float  
data Shape = Circle Point Radius

Is it possible to write something in line with the code below (Code fails compiling):

data LengthQty = Radius Float | Length Float | Width Float   
data Shape = Circle Point Radius

Idea behind this attempt is that Radius, Length and Width are representing Physical Quantity Length.

Please note that in the second part second line if written like

data Shape = Circle Point LengthQty

Then, it compiles, but in that case the "LengthQty" can be anything like Length, Width or Radius, where only Radius is required.

(1) What is wrong in second part?
(2) How it can be corrected to implement the idea of Physical Quantity Length (LengthQty)?

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1  
That's IMO not one of the best examples in LYAH, data Radius = Radius Float is actually a rather stupid definition, you'd normally just write type Radius = Float for this kind of stuff. And use record systax to further clarify the meaning of each field in Circle. –  leftaroundabout Jul 20 '12 at 7:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The reason that your code doesn't compile is that the right-hand side of a data declaration must be a constructor followed by a list of types, i.e. of the form

data {-type-} = {-constructor-} {-type-} ... {-type-}

In your example, when you define

data LengthQty = Radius Float | Length Float | Width Float 

you have made LengthQty a type whereas Radius, Length and Width are constructors. Therefore when you write

data Shape = Circle Point Radius

the compiler sees something of the form

data {-type-} = {-constructor-} {-type-} {-constructor-}

i.e. it sees a constructor where it is expecting a type, so it throws an error. In the original code, the symbol Radius was used for both a constructor and a type. When the compiler sees

data Shape = Circle Point Radius

it knows that Radius in this context has to be a type, so there is no possibility of confusion with the constructor radius.

With this in mind, you can make your code compile correctly if you just write

data Shape = Circle Point LengthQty

and you can get a particular instance of a circle with

circle :: Shape
circle = Circle (Point 0 0) (Radius 1)
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Is there any possibility where Type Classes can has Sub Type Classes in haskell? –  Optimight Jul 19 '12 at 18:53
1  
Typeclasses can have subclasses, but the word 'subclass' means something different than what it does in OO languages. –  Chris Taylor Jul 19 '12 at 19:10
    
@Optimight Not really. You can do a context requirement for an instance, though... However, the context requirement is checked after and isn't used in the resolving process. –  alternative Jul 20 '12 at 0:24
    
@alternative Can you please explain with the given example? I am an absolute beginner and not able to interpret your comment in actual code. –  Optimight Jul 20 '12 at 0:28

This compiles:

data Point = Point Float Float  
data Radius = Radius Float  
data Shape = Circle Point Radius

data LengthQty = R Float | Length Float | Width Float   

Radius is name of the type and also of data constructor of type Float -> Radius; R is a data constructor of type Float -> LengthQty. You can't have two different data constructors with same name. The name Radius is already taken.

The following also works:

data LengthQty = R Radius | Length Float | Width Float 

Without R, Radius by itself would be a data constructor of type :: LengthQty, which would, again, clash with Radius :: Float -> Radius.

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Is there any possibility where Type Classes can have Sub Type Classes in haskell? –  Optimight Jul 19 '12 at 18:53
2  
You aren't using any classes here. You are using data types. But classes in Haskell (which are completely different from object-oriented classes) can indeed have subclasses. –  dflemstr Jul 19 '12 at 18:55
    
dflemstr: Yes, I read it but completely missed it while putting up my question in comment. Still the Object Oriented Paradigm thinking overrides. My question should have been: " Is there any possibility where data-types can have sub-data-types in haskell? –  Optimight Jul 20 '12 at 0:34
    
@Optimight: in OO terms, haskell datatypes support 'has-a" relationships, but not 'is-a'. Type classes provide support for polymorphic functions, but trying to use them like OO classes is generally unsuccessful. –  John L Jul 20 '12 at 2:25

The useful difference between

data Point = Point Float Float  
data Radius = Radius Float  
data Shape = Circle Point Radius

and
data LengthQty = Radius Float | Length Float | Width Float

is the way Haskell's type system handles them. Haskell has a powerful type system, which makes sure that a function is passed data that it can handle. The reason you'd write a definition like LengthQuantity is if you had a function which could take either a Radius, Length, or Width, which your function can't do.

If you did have a function which could take a Radius, Length, or Width, I'd write your types like this:

data Point = Point Float Float  
data Radius = Radius Float  
data Shape = Circle Point Radius

data LengthQty = R Radius
               | L Length 
               | W Width

This way, functions that can only take a Radius benefit from that more specific type checking.

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