Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a long list of languages and their respective codes (http://pastebin.com/rn4JbTtP), which was generated by MP4Box. I want to load this list into some sort of key-value store in C# (like a dictionary), so that the user will be able to select a language from a combo box and the program will return the respective language code.

Is there any way this can be done without reading the text file each time the program is run? If so, how?

UPDATE (as commented here): Sorry, I didn't explain myself clearly. I've got no problem with reading text files, it's just that the current format requires a lot of parsing before it can be fed into a Dictionary. What will be the best way to store these pairs so that it will require the least amount of parsing at runtime?

share|improve this question
    
What will be the Key for each Key/Value pair? – Robert Harvey Jul 19 '12 at 17:50
1  
You mean other than hard-code-initialize a dictionary with the parsed version of it? – lc. Jul 19 '12 at 17:51
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You will have to read the file anyway on the startup of your application. One solution could be to create an xml file containing your languages like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<Languages>
  <Language Name="English" Code="en"/>
  <Language Name="German" Code="de"/>
</Languages> 

and you can also have a small class to hold the name and the code of the language like this:

 class Language
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string Code { get; set; }
    }

and a reading method to read all languages:

 private static List<Language> ReadLanguageFile()
        {
            List<Language> languages = new List<Language>();
            string path = @"LanguagesFile.xml";
            XDocument xdoc = XDocument.Load(path);
            var lans = xdoc.Root.Elements("Language");
            Language lan;
            foreach (var item in lans)
            {
                lan = new Language();
                lan.Name = item.Attribute("Name").Value;
                lan.Code = item.Attribute("Code").Value;
                languages.Add(lan);
            }
            return languages;
        }

then you may bind your combo box data source to the language list like this:

cmb.DataSource = ReadLanguageFile();
cmb.DisplayMember="Name";
cmb.ValueMember="Code";

Now, if you don't want to create a file for languages you may create a class which keeps all your languages like this:

public sealed class Languages
    {
        public static List<Language> GetLanguages()
        {
            return new List<Language>
            {
                new Language{Code="en",Name="English"},
                new Language{Code="de",Name="German"},
            };
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

Is there any way this can be done without reading the text file each time the program is run?

Not really. The data needs to be loaded into memory somehow. As @lc commented, outside of hardcoding the dictionary into the application code, you will need to store it and read it.

You can store the data for reading in several ways, but it will need to be read into memory:

  • Save to a local text file
  • Serialize to a local file
  • Use an embedded database to store the data

Update:

Seeing as you want to load local data with minimum parsing, I suggest that once you have parsed the data into a dictionary, you serialize the dictionary to disk. When you deserialize from disk, you will have a populated instance of a dictionary.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I didn't explain myself clearly. I've got no problem with reading text files, it's just that the current format requires a lot of parsing before it can be fed into a Dictionary. What will be the best way to store these pairs so that it will require the least amount of parsing at runtime? – Michael Bikovitsky Jul 19 '12 at 18:20
    
Parsing one time into a dictionary then serializing the dictionary to disk. – Oded Jul 19 '12 at 18:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.