Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know Oracle sometimes "judges" that it's better to perform full table scan as oppose to index scan, however still being in a "learning stage", I'm just trying to get a better understanding of "when" oracle will determine the best route. For example, I have simple query:

Select *
  FROM GLMV_JOURNAL_LOGS JLOG 
       INNER JOIN GLMV_Transact_Details TDTL 
          ON TDTL.TR_REF_NO = JLOG.TR_REF_NO 
         AND TDTL.SCAT_KEY = JLOG.Scat_key 
         AND TDTL.CASE_KEY = JLOG.CASE_KEY 
         AND TDTL.TR_CD = JLOG.TR_CD 
       INNER JOIN FUND_DESC FDDC 
          ON FDDC.FD_DESC_ID = TDTL.FD_DESC_ID  
       INNER JOIN FD_RATES FDRT 
          ON  FDRT.FDRT_KEY = TDTL.FDRT_KEY
       INNER JOIN BEN_TYPES BNTP 
          ON BNTP.BNTP_KEY = FDRT.BNTP_KEY 
 WHERE JLOG.JRNL_CD  = '0' 
   AND JLOG.SRC_CD = '2' 
   AND JLOG.MKEY_FD_NUM <> 0 
   AND NVL(JLOG.TMOV_KEY, -1) > 0 
   AND NVL(JLOG.ORIG_SCAT_KEY, 1) = 1 
   AND TDTL.STAT_CD <> '4' 
   AND NVL(TDTL.ORIG_SCAT_KEY, 1) = 1 

The join on FD_RATES is joining on PK value, which I also created a corresponding index on GLMV_Transact_Details in thinking that a full table scan would be prevented, however, based on the explain plan below, it's not, even after I've performed index rebuild and gather table stats, the outcome is still the same:

Explain Plan

Now if I go into my query and add the following where clause:

AND  FDRT.FDRT_KEY = 100

The index will kick in of course, but I guess I'm curious as to why it's not when doing an inner join.... any tips??

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The optimizer has estimated the cost of the full table scan on FD_RATES as 106. The join this feeds into has an estimated cardinality of 416, as does the other row source feeding that join. If we were to replace the hash join with a nested loop, doing a unique index (PK) lookup for each row, the cost would be at least 1, probably 2 or 3, for each iteration of the loop, and we think there will be 416 iterations, so that would be a cost of at least 416, probably double or triple that, which is much more than the estimated cost of doing the full table scan.

Now, the estimates could be wrong. The main thing to look at, in my experience, is the cardinalities shown in the plan. If these are reasonably accurate, then there's a good chance that Oracle has picked reasonably efficient join order and access paths -- not necessarily the most efficient, but close.

If you want to try to force an index scan to see how it performs, I believe the hint you want would be:

Select /*+ INDEX(fdrt) */ *
...
share|improve this answer

I am going to ignore your example, and just try to answer your FTS vs. Index question :)

Typically, the reason for using an index is to minimize the data blocks you need to read to satisfy your query. This is greatly determined by how your data is physically stored in the table. It makes no difference what percent of the rows you are selecting, but rather how many blocks you can avoid by using an index instead of a full table scan. For example, if you have a table with 30 million rows across 3000 blocks, and you want to select 15,000 rows (or .5%) should you use an index? Well, if all 15,000 rows are in the last 200 blocks, then an index definitely makes sense. However, if the query has to get 5 rows from each data block to get the 15,000 rows, a full table scan makes more sense since you have to touch all of the blocks anyways.

Cary Millsap uses a great example of thinking of Oracle indexes like an index in a book. If you have a book on oracle, and you look up "Partition" it will probably point you to a lot of occurrences across a relatively small set of pages. So in this case, using the index was a good idea. However, if you look up "Row", that may have the same number of occurrences as "Partition", but they will be spread across most of the pages. In that case it is better to "full-scan" and just read every page in order rather than flipping back and forth between the pages and the index.

Oracle stores approximations in your index about how your data in the table is physically stored, and uses that information when determining which path to choose. Obviously a lot more goes into the optimizer than this (and you can ruin it with bad statistics or parameter settings), but this should get you started.

share|improve this answer

I don't have enough information for a full answer, but here are some remarks:

  • I wouldn't call a 5-table join like yours simple. Can you leave out a table?
  • A full table scan is only bad if the table is big. For a smaller table, the is no difference to index-based access.
  • You can use hints (embedded into comments) to direct the optimizer to use a certain access path.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response... even with just 2 tables (transact_details and FD_Rates), the full table scan will still occur. FD_Rates isn't very big, however transact_details has over 26 million rows. What types of hints are conventionally used on JOINS to force index use? If I can at least get an understanding of "when" or "how" I can force it, at least it'll give me something to test and benchmark to see if if it's worth it in the outcome. –  denisb Jul 19 '12 at 18:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.