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Here is where the GUI is drawn(note, the class extends JFrame).

public Cache() {
    SubstanceColorChooserUI col = new SubstanceColorChooserUI();
    while (mode == 0);
    setResizable(false);
    setTitle("Cache");
    setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    setBounds(100, 100, 483, 374);
    setLocationRelativeTo(null);
    contentPane = new JPanel();
    contentPane.setBorder(new EmptyBorder(5, 5, 5, 5));
    setContentPane(contentPane);
    contentPane.setLayout(new BorderLayout());

    textField = new JTextField();
    textField.setBounds(10, 11, 328, 20);
    contentPane.add(textField);
    textField.setColumns(10);

    JButton btnLoadCache = new JButton("Load cache");
    btnLoadCache.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
            try {
                String loc = textField.getText();
                if (loc.equals("")) {
                    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(Cache.this, "Please specify a location for the cache.", "Unable to load", JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAGE);
                    return;
                }
                if (!loc.endsWith("\\"))
                    loc = loc + "\\";
                cache = new Store(loc);
                loadImages();
            } catch (Exception e) {
                JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(Cache.this, "Cache failed to initialize.\n" + e.getMessage(), "Unable to load", JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAGE);
            }
        }
    });
    btnLoadCache.setBounds(351, 9, 112, 23);
    contentPane.add(btnLoadCache);

    JSplitPane splitPane = new JSplitPane();
    splitPane.setDividerLocation(150);
    splitPane.setContinuousLayout(true);
    splitPane.setBounds(10, 44, 453, 279);
    contentPane.add(splitPane);

    JPanel panellie = new JPanel();
    panellie.setLayout(new BorderLayout(0, 0));
    panel = new ImagePanel(null);

    scrollPane_1 = new JScrollPane();
    panellie.add(scrollPane_1, "Center");

    scrollPane_1.setViewportView(panel);
    splitPane.setRightComponent(panellie);

    JPanel panel_1 = new JPanel();
    splitPane.setLeftComponent(panel_1);
    panel_1.setLayout(new BorderLayout(0, 0));

    JScrollPane scrollPane = new JScrollPane();
    panel_1.add(scrollPane, BorderLayout.CENTER);

    model = new DefaultListModel<ListedImage>();
    list = new JList<ListedImage>(model);
    list.addListSelectionListener(new ListSelectionListener() {
        public void valueChanged(ListSelectionEvent arg0) {
            if (arg0.getValueIsAdjusting())
                return;
            ListedImage img = list.getModel().getElementAt(list.getSelectedIndex());
            panel.setImage(img.getImage());
        }
    });
    scrollPane.setViewportView(list);

    progressBar = new JProgressBar();
    progressBar.setStringPainted(true);
    progressBar.setDoubleBuffered(true);
    progressBar.setBounds(10, 328, 453, 14);
    contentPane.add(progressBar);

}

How would I make it so when I setResizeable to true and I start dragging the program to be bigger and smaller, how do I make it so that the components inside of the frame(buttons, labels, etc) resize when the whole Frame is resizes

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Have you tired anchoring the controls to the JFrame? –  M2X Jul 20 '12 at 6:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Use a layout manager instead of setting the bounds for each component.

It is going to vary from program to program how you want your components to move.

Take a look at this, and try to see which layout will work best for you.

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The problem is, I like my component in an exact spot. I don't really like using a general spot. –  Jonathan Beaudoin Jul 19 '12 at 18:25
1  
Well if you use absolute positioning, you aren't going to be able to easily change your components size as the frame changes. The only other option is to make all of the bounds dependent on the frame. Its a pain, and I would strongly advise against it. LayoutManagers are a far better choice in the long run and will give you software a more professional look. –  Rob Wagner Jul 19 '12 at 18:27
    
I'll try out the LayoutManagers, thanks for the suggestion. –  Jonathan Beaudoin Jul 19 '12 at 19:06
1  
No problem, I promise you'll be happy you did. If you liked my answer, you can accept it by clicking the checkmark to your left. People typically frown upon low accept rates, and you might see less people willing to answer your questions. –  Rob Wagner Jul 19 '12 at 19:14

1. You can use setSize() method to set your JFrame size.

2. You can choose to make the size of JFrame fixed by setting isResizable(false).

3. Use GroupLayout, developed by NetBeans team in 2005, try using the Windows Builder Pro provided by Google now for free. Here you can select GroupLayout, and then drag and drop your components in the JFrame, even if you want you can manually edit the GUI code.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm using the window builder plugin for eclipse –  Jonathan Beaudoin Jul 19 '12 at 18:38

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