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I am a complete beginner in Python, and would like to start learning it by doing. Namely, I'd love to correct some EXIF information in a huge bunch of family photos I have. To start with, I want to just get this information out of JPEG files properly.

Some of them have a title written in EXIF. It can be obtained e.g. by

import pyexiv2
metadata = pyexiv2.ImageMetadata(filename)
metadata.read()
title = metadata['Exif.Image.XPTitle'] 

This far I've got. Now comes the problem. Some of the titles contain Cyrillic letters. If I do print title.human_value I get for example

`Милой Мамуле от Майи, 11 ÑÐ½Ð²Ð°Ñ€Ñ 1944.`

while with print title, it is

<Exif.Image.XPTitle [Byte] = 28 4 56 4 59 4 62 4 57 4 32 0 28 4 48 4 60 4 67 4 59 4 53 4 32 0 62 4 66 4 32 0 28 4 48 4 57 4 56 4 44 0 32 0 49 0 49 0 32 0 79 4 61 4 50 4 48 4 64 4 79 4 32 0 49 0 57 0 52 0 52 0 46 0 0 0>

The actual string I'd love to see is

Милой Мамуле от Майи, 11 января 1944.

It seems to be a unicode problem, but after trying already a dozen of different methods found here and elsewhere, I just cannot cope with it. Is it possible to see Russian letters in the console at all? I am using python(xy) on Windows 7 (English), so my IDE is spyder2. Just the default installation, to which I added pyexiv2. TIA!

share|improve this question
    
wow is that a letter from a soldier to his mother in russia from the war? –  Yuck Jul 19 '12 at 18:23
    
Let's figure out what exactly our data is. What do you get for type( title.human_value ) and [ord(x) for x in title.human_value]? –  Russell Borogove Jul 19 '12 at 18:28
    
@RussellBorogove: <type 'str'> and [208, 156, 208, 184, 208, 187, 208, 190, 208, 185, 32, 208, 156, 208, 176, 208, 188, 209, 131, 208, 187, 208, 181, 32, 208, 190, 209, 130, 32, 208, 156, 208, 176, 208, 185, 208, 184, 44, 32, 49, 49, 32, 209, 143, 208, 189, 208, 178, 208, 176, 209, 128, 209, 143, 32, 49, 57, 52, 52, 46] –  texnic Jul 21 '12 at 10:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The bytes are UTF-16.

In Python 3:

>>> b = [28, 4, 56, 4, 59, 4, 62, 4, 57, 4, 32, 0, 28, 4, 48, 4, 60, 4, 67, 4, 59, 4, 53, 4, 32, 0, 62, 4, 66, 4, 32, 0, 28, 4, 48, 4, 57, 4, 56, 4, 44, 0, 32, 0, 49, 0, 49, 0, 32, 0, 79, 4, 61, 4, 50, 4, 48, 4, 64, 4, 79, 4, 32, 0, 49, 0, 57, 0, 52, 0, 52, 0, 46, 0, 0, 0]
>>> bytes(b).decode("utf-16")
'Милой Мамуле от Майи, 11 января 1944.\x00'

In Python 2:

>>> b = [28, 4, 56, 4, 59, 4, 62, 4, 57, 4, 32, 0, 28, 4, 48, 4, 60, 4, 67, 4, 59, 4, 53, 4, 32, 0, 62, 4, 66, 4, 32, 0, 28, 4, 48, 4, 57, 4, 56, 4, 44, 0, 32, 0, 49, 0, 49, 0, 32, 0, 79, 4, 61, 4, 50, 4, 48, 4, 64, 4, 79, 4, 32, 0, 49, 0, 57, 0, 52, 0, 52, 0, 46, 0, 0, 0]
>>> "".join(chr(c) for c in b).decode("utf-16")
u'\u041c\u0438\u043b\u043e\u0439 \u041c\u0430\u043c\u0443\u043b\u0435 \u043e\u04
42 \u041c\u0430\u0439\u0438, 11 \u044f\u043d\u0432\u0430\u0440\u044f 1944.\x00'
share|improve this answer
    
Can it be that it works only in Python 3? I have 2.7.2, and I get Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> File "C:\Python27\lib\encodings\utf_16.py", line 16, in decode return codecs.utf_16_decode(input, errors, True) UnicodeDecodeError: 'utf16' codec can't decode byte 0x5d in position 264: truncated data –  texnic Jul 21 '12 at 10:47
    
The added solution works fine in terms of showing the codes. However, the original question was: is it possible to see Russian letters. Is it impossible with Python 2 at all? I am ready to switch to Python 3, however my distribution Python(xy) was with Python 2, and I'd like to use python-to-exe converters later. So I stick to Python 2 for now. –  texnic Jul 23 '12 at 15:58
    
I did the Python 3 example in IDLE, but the Python 2 example in the Python console. If I do the Python 2 example in IDLE and print the result, I get Милой Мамуле от Майи, 11 января 1944.. –  MRAB Jul 23 '12 at 18:33
    
After some days of searching I believe that IDLE should be somehow set to do the Unicode output. However I fail to make it do so. My IDLE encoding is 'cp1252', Spyder encoding is 'none'. I tried creating the Windows environment variable PYTHONIOENCODING=utf-8, but it doesn't change anything. You use Mac, and the default encoding is probably some Unicode. –  texnic Jul 28 '12 at 17:05
    
I used IDLE on Windows XP Pro (32-bit). –  MRAB Jul 31 '12 at 0:24

I think the title.human_value data is in UTF-8, having already been decoded from the raw UTF-16 bytes of title.

In the python shell, running in a terminal window on OSX:

>>> # this should be the same as your title.human_value:
>>> print ''.join( chr(x) for x in [208, 156, 208, 184, 208, 
              187, 208, 190, 208, 185, 32, 208, 156, 208, 
              176, 208, 188, 209, 131, 208, 187, 208, 181, 
              32, 208, 190, 209, 130, 32, 208, 156, 208, 
              176, 208, 185, 208, 184, 44, 32, 49, 49, 32, 
              209, 143, 208, 189, 208, 178, 208, 176, 209, 
              128, 209, 143, 32, 49, 57, 52, 52, 46])

Милой Мамуле от Майи, 11 января 1944.

Your console may not support Cyrillic characters. You might try setting the font in the Command Prompt to "Lucida Console" -- a more modern vector font is more likely to support it correctly than the historical bitmapped fonts that cmd defaults to.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't help. With print u'привет' I get ??????. Your code shows Милой Мамуле от Майи, 11 ÑÐ½Ð²Ð°Ñ€Ñ 1944. as mine in the beginning. This is resolved by solution from MRAB, but I still don't get the Russian symbols. –  texnic Jul 23 '12 at 16:00
    
I don't think it's a Python 2 issue (I'm using Python 2.6), I think it's a terminal encoding issue. At the python prompt, try import sys; print sys.stdout.encoding. –  Russell Borogove Jul 23 '12 at 17:43
    
It says none. –  texnic Jul 24 '12 at 15:53
    
Try setting it to 'utf-8' and printing your string again? I'm not sure how my sys encoding gets set... –  Russell Borogove Jul 24 '12 at 17:50
    
I feel myself helpless. I don't know how to set it. Moreover, some functions, mentioned at the help pages (e.g. sys.getdefaultencoding), are not appearing in my Python! Probably, I should first get some Python experience and then return to this issue. In the meantime, I'm using a workaround: display Unicode strings using PyQt. –  texnic Jul 28 '12 at 16:35

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