Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know that print line is NSLog. How do I print a line 10 times in Objective-C?

share|improve this question
3  
Um why do you want to NSLog something ten times? –  Dustin Jul 19 '12 at 19:23
14  
How about NSLog(@"print this line");NSLog(@"print this line");NSLog(@"print this line");NSLog(@"print this line");NSLog(@"print this line");NSLog(@"print this line");NSLog(@"print this line");NSLog(@"print this line");NSLog(@"print this line");NSLog(@"print this line");? The key word for your search is loop. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 19 '12 at 19:23

9 Answers 9

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use a for loop:

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    NSLog(@"print this line");
}
share|improve this answer

I haven't had a chance to refactor yet, but something like this should work!

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    if(i == 0)
        NSLog(@"A line");
    else if (i == 1)
        NSLog(@"A line");
    else if (i == 2)
        NSLog(@"A line");
    else if (i == 3)
        NSLog(@"A line");
    else if (i == 4)
        NSLog(@"A line");
    else if (i == 5)
        NSLog(@"A line");
    else if (i == 6)
        NSLog(@"A line");
    else if (i == 7)
        NSLog(@"A line");
    else if (i == 8)
        NSLog(@"A line");
    else if (i == 9)
        NSLog(@"A line");
}
share|improve this answer
3  
How inefficient, that should be a switch case! –  Hannesh Jul 25 '12 at 8:45
1  
You should use a modification of Duff's device that prints instead of copies! –  user142019 Jan 15 '13 at 14:25

Another while loop option.

//
//  main.m
//  Pritner
//
//  Created by Joshua Caswell on 7/19/12.
//

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
#import <objc/runtime.h>

// A Pritner instance holds and displays a passed-in string. The string is publicly
// unchangeable.
@interface Pritner : NSObject

+ (id)pritnerWithLine: (NSString *)newLine;
- (void)printLine;

@property (readonly, copy, nonatomic) NSString * line;

@end

// Extension to manage "class variable" for counting number of created instances
@interface Pritner ()

+ (NSUInteger)numPritnersCreated;
+ (void)setNumPritnersCreated:(NSUInteger)n;
+ (NSUInteger)maxNumPritners;

@property (readwrite, copy, nonatomic) NSString * line;

- (id)initWithLine: (NSString *)line;

@end

@implementation Pritner

@synthesize line;

+ (id)pritnerWithLine: (NSString *)newLine {
    id newInstance = [[self alloc] initWithLine:newLine];
    if( newInstance ){
        NSUInteger createdSoFar = [self numPritnersCreated];
        // Only allow maxNumPritners to ever be created; keeping track of them
        // is the client's problem.
        if( createdSoFar >= [self maxNumPritners] ){
            abort();
        }
        [self setNumPritnersCreated:createdSoFar + 1];
    }

    return newInstance;
}

// Fake class variable using associated objects; keep count of created instances 
char numPritnerKey;
+ (NSUInteger)numPritnersCreated {
    NSNumber * n = objc_getAssociatedObject(self, &numPritnerKey);
    if( !n ){
        n = [NSNumber numberWithUnsignedInteger:0];
        [self setNumPritnersCreated:0];
    }
    return [n unsignedIntegerValue];
}

+ (void)setNumPritnersCreated:(NSUInteger)n {
    objc_setAssociatedObject(self, 
                             &numPritnerKey, 
                             [NSNumber numberWithUnsignedInteger:n], 
                             OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN);
}

// Maximum number of instances ever allowed to be created
+ (NSUInteger)maxNumPritners {
    return 10;
}

- (id)initWithLine: (NSString *)newLine {

    self = [super init];
    if( !self ) return nil;

    line = [newLine copy];

    return self;
}

- (void)printLine {
    NSLog(@"%@", [self line]);
}


@end

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{

    @autoreleasepool {

        while( YES ){
            Pritner * p = [Pritner pritnerWithLine:@"I figure, if you're going to build a time machine out of a car, why not do it with some style?"];
            [p printLine];
        }

    }
    return 0;
}

Please don't use this in real life.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hahahahhaha... +1 –  Polynomial Jul 24 '12 at 11:19
    
lol. Pritner as well –  sehe Jan 15 '13 at 14:31
    
Can you do a more verbose version? –  Matt Fletcher Jan 7 at 14:55

Use recursion:

print(10);

void print(int i){
   if(i == 0)
      return;
   NSLog(@"print this line");
   print(i - 1);
}
share|improve this answer

Don't forget the "object" in "Objective-C".

NSArray *lines = [@"123456789" componentsSeparatedByCharactersInSet:[NSCharacterSet alphanumericCharacterSet]];
[lines enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger i, BOOL* stop) {
    NSLog(@"a line");
}];

If you think Objective-C isn't true enough to its Smalltalk roots, you can do something like the following.

typedef void (^LoopBlock)(NSNumber*);
@interface NSNumber (loop)
-(void)to:(NSNumber*)upTo do:(LoopBlock)block;
-(void)timesRepeat:(LoopBlock)block;
@end

@implementation NSNumber (loop)
static NSString *loopSeparator = @"_";
-(void)to:(NSNumber*)upTo do:(LoopBlock)block {
    [   [   [@"" stringByPaddingToLength:[upTo unsignedIntegerValue]-[self unsignedIntegerValue]
                              withString:loopSeparator
                         startingAtIndex:0
            ] componentsSeparatedByString:loopSeparator
        ] enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger i, BOOL* stop) {
            block([NSNumber numberWithUnsignedInteger:i+[self unsignedIntegerValue]]);
        }
    ];
}

-(void)timesRepeat:(LoopBlock)block {
    [[NSNumber numberWithUnsignedInteger: 1] to:self do:block];
}
@end


int main() {
    @autoreleasepool {
        [[NSNumber numberWithInt:10] 
          timesRepeat:^(NSNumber* i){
                NSLog(@"a line");
            }];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Hands down, this is the best answer here. –  Josh Caswell Jul 23 '12 at 16:40
    
This is... wow. I need a drink. –  Polynomial Jul 24 '12 at 11:19

Use Grand Central Dispatch another way:

dispatch_apply(10, dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^(size_t curr_iteration){
    NSLog(@"a line");
});
share|improve this answer
    
Oh that's much better than mine. –  benzado Jul 19 '12 at 19:51
    
I was honestly surprised you didn't use dispatch_apply()! –  Josh Caswell Jul 19 '12 at 19:52
    
This is honestly the first time I've seen a use for it. –  benzado Jul 19 '12 at 19:56
    
Yeah, I've never figured out what to use it for either, but it seems like when we find that thing, it'll be really nice to have. –  Josh Caswell Jul 19 '12 at 20:16

Use a goto statement:

  int i = 0;
print:
  NSLog(@"print this line");
  if (i++ < 10) goto print;
share|improve this answer
    
THis actually does only print 9 lines. Shame on you! –  FUZxxl Jul 23 '12 at 11:36
    
@FUZxxl Fixed! (I think) –  benzado Jul 23 '12 at 14:50

Use Grand Central Dispatch:

__block int i = 0;
__block dispatch_block_t print_block = ^() {
    NSLog(@"print this line");
    i += 1;
    if (i < 10) dispatch_sync(dispatch_get_main_queue(), print_block);
}
dispatch_sync(dispatch_get_main_queue(), print_block);
share|improve this answer
    
Beautiful!! :'D –  Hannesh Jul 19 '12 at 19:49

Use a while loop:

int i = 0;
while (i < 10) {
    NSLog(@"print this line");
    i += 1;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
What?! No recursion example? –  Josh Caswell Jul 19 '12 at 19:43
1  
@JoshCaswell You spoke too soon! Hannesh to the rescue! –  benzado Jul 19 '12 at 19:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.