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So I want to do this because I think it is the most idiomatic way to do errors.

For example:

User < ActiveRecord::Base
  def add_email?
    ...
    #in the case that it does have an error
    MyErrorObjectThatEvaluatesToFalse.new("The email is already taken")
  end

  def is_valid_user?
    ...
    MyErrorObjectThatEvaluatesToFalse.new("Username is not set")
    ...
  end
end

...

SomeController
    ...
    if error = user.add_email?
      render_error_msg(error.message) and return
    elsif error = user.is_valid_user?
      render_error_msg(error.message) and return
    end
    ...
end

I've tried one of the solutions below, but it doesn't have the functionality that I would like:

  class A
    def ==(comp)
      false
    end
  end

  a = A.new
  if a
    puts "'a' evaluated to true"
  else
    puts "'a' evaluated to false"
  end

  #=> 'a' evaluated to true

Is there a way to do something like this or has some else found a way to handle errors that is better than the current rails way of indirectly getting the message with a combination of user.valid? and user.errors?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
this is not idiomatic, why don't you set N model validations + a single record.save or record.update_attributes in the controller? Controllers must be simple. –  tokland Jul 19 '12 at 19:42

1 Answer 1

I would not recommend this as a method of validation, however to define a class that returns false on a comparator:

class A
  def ==(comp)
    false
  end
end

A.new == "a"   #false
A.new == true  #false
A.new == false #false
A.new == nil   #false

I would recommend using rails' built in validations.

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  validates :username, :presence => true
end

user = User.new
user.errors #["username must not be blank"]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the advice, there are just a whole bunch of things that I'm doing outside of ActiveRecord (ideally it should all be integrated in but its not now...) Also I tried doing the above, but the specific functionality below doesn't seem to work: gist.github.com/160e1db7b3724c71b541 –  Jonathan Leung Jul 19 '12 at 23:01
    
Yeah, that doesn't work because you are not comparing it to anything. a still returns the object A, otherwise you could no longer reference the object. You have to explicitly to a == anything –  Gazler Jul 20 '12 at 6:33
    
Yes, is there any way to achieve that functionality ie emulating false or nil? I know that for both of them, there is only ever one instance of them and I can't create more instances of FalseClass or NilClass, even if I subclass them... And instance eval on them doesn't work either so I can't add a message onto them and even if that worked, that could have strange consequences as there is only once instance of them. Maybe this is just going down the wrong route though... –  Jonathan Leung Jul 20 '12 at 16:29

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