Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to enable debugging options in MuPDF. For some reason they have used #ifndef NDEBUG and #endif greying out code I want to use. I searched throughout the library but couldn't find any traces of NDEBUG defined anywhere. I've managed to work around this by adding #undef NDEBUG in a header, but I would like to know if there is a more non-intrusive method to do so.

SO, can you enable "#ifndef/#endif" blocks from the makefile?

Also, why would you use #ifndef to grey out code? Isn't it supposed to be #ifdef NDEBUG?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can add -DNDEBUG to the following 3 variables - CFLAGS, CPPFLAGS and CXXFLAGS in your Makefile to define NDEBUG. Which is equivalent to adding #define NDEBUG

There are other variations too:

-DNBDEBUG=1

is equivalent to

#define NDEBUG 1

And to answer the question of why would someone use #ifndef instead of #ifdef is because it highlights your modifications to the original code much clearly.

For example consider the following code as the original version:

int a = 123;
int b = 346;
int c = a + b;

And you need to add a macro DO_MULT which will multiply instead - there are 2 ways to do this.

First Variation:

int a = 123;
int b = 346;
#ifdef DO_MULT
int c = a *b;
#else
int c = a + b;
#endif

Second variation:

int a = 123;
int b = 346;
#ifndef DO_MULT
int c = a + b;
#else
int c = a *b;
#endif

If you use difftools to see the changes - the second variation will show the diff more clearly compared to the first one.

One more reason why you would use a #ifndef is to DO something in CATCH-ALL-EXCEPT scenarios.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your wonderful insight! –  Some Noob Student Jul 19 '12 at 20:28
add comment

#ifndef won't omit the code if the flag is defined, hence it's usage. You've managed to include the code using #undef.

Both #ifdef and #ifndef are useful, as justification consider this contrived example: you have a bunch of debug printf code that you only want to compile into a Debug build, using #ifdef DEBUG conditions. In the same executable you also have code that you want to leave out of a Debug build. In this case using #ifndef DEBUG is your only choice.

You can define such flags in the makefile, and you can also try to remove previous definitions by using -U. Look for a CFLAGS variable in the makefile and add -UNDEBUG, or add it directly to the compiler call in the compilation target.

If the flag is being defined somewhere in the source tree then this won't help.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for telling me about the -U flag –  Some Noob Student Jul 19 '12 at 20:28
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.