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I want to know what the best way to know if all values of a collection match a particular value.

List<Integer> listOfStrings = new ArrayList<Integer>();

All I want to know is if all the entries in the "listOfStrings" match a particular value; for instance there is no integer that is not '1'.

I need the fastest solution to this. I have a solution with me but it is very rudimentary.

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1  
Why you you have a variable called listofStrings which is really of list of Integers? –  dcp Jul 19 '12 at 20:42
1  
I would start by renaming listOfStrings to integers. Good naming is one of the most important things in programming, and naming a list of integers "listOfStrings" is a really really bad idea. –  JB Nizet Jul 19 '12 at 20:43
    
What is your 'rudimentary' method? And when you say 'fastest' do you mean in terms of efficiency or what? –  Nathaniel Ford Jul 19 '12 at 20:59
    
You should examine how your data structure is being built. If you can utilize a Set, you should; then checks like this are instant. –  Nathaniel Ford Jul 19 '12 at 22:10
    
Thanks dcp and JB Nizet. I was actually working with a list of strings and for the sake of having it asked I named it listOfStrings. –  N3WYrK Jul 19 '12 at 23:06

7 Answers 7

Loop through it:

public boolean checkAll(ArrayList<String> list) {
    for(int i = 0; i < listOfStrings.size(); i++) {
        String candidate = listOfStrings.get(i);
        if(candidate == null || !candidate.equals("1")) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
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This will fail if any value of the list is null... throw new NullPointerException(). –  ZNK - M Jul 20 '12 at 6:52

You could just iterate over your list with a simple for loop, and compare every value with your certain value (say 1). If one value from your list is not equal to the certain value, just set a boolean to false.

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Just an additional note: If a value is not equal to the desired value, you should both set the boolean to false and break the loop. –  jrad Jul 19 '12 at 20:49

Just do this

public boolean isFilled(String value, ArrayList<String> list)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < list.size(); i++)
    {
        String toTest = list.get(i);
        if(toTest == null || !toTest.equals(value)) {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}
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-1. Doesn't even compile. You're comparing an int with a STring. –  JB Nizet Jul 19 '12 at 21:00
2  
you know JB some people take the time out of their day to post from mobile devices (iphones) ect where they cant compile and fully check syntax errors. and later make revisions –  Bob Sinclar Jul 19 '12 at 21:12
    
Err, yes, so what? I take much time every day to post without compiling, and I find it normal to get a downvote if my answer is plain wrong. I'll happily remove my down vote if the answer is fixed. You don't need a compiler to know that you can't compare a STring with an int. And if you need one, why answer without a compiler at hand? –  JB Nizet Jul 19 '12 at 21:16
    
true i guess your helping enforce the quality of posts on here. There is a difference between a missing semi colon and comparing objects to primitive data types. Never really thought about it like that. –  Bob Sinclar Jul 19 '12 at 21:20
    
You're right, I fixed it. I didn't get a chance to compile it, I was on my phone. The concept is still the same though. –  theDazzler Jul 19 '12 at 21:23
 boolean x=true;
     ArrayList<Integer> listOfInts = new ArrayList<Integer>   (Arrays.asList(5,3,1,2,9,5,0,7));
    Integer target = 1;
    for (int i = 0; i < listOfInts.size(); i++)
    {
        if (listOfInts.get(i).equals(target)) // nothing
        {

        } else {
            x = false;
            break;// exits loop right after this
        }
    }
    System.out.println(x);
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good catch, fixed though im not sure about the break statement to exit the loop. I dont think this is the smartest way to do it –  Bob Sinclar Jul 19 '12 at 21:31
    
It's OK, but the best way is to extract the loop to a method, and return from the method. You could also add && !x to the stop condition of the loop. And it would be clearer with if (!listOfInts.get(i).equals(target)) {x = false;}: it doesn't need an empty if block followed by an else. –  JB Nizet Jul 19 '12 at 21:35
    
thanks, i wasnt sure if the ! worked in the front so i just made it the way i knew .equals would work –  Bob Sinclar Jul 19 '12 at 21:43

In Java 8 you can use the allMatch method of a stream to achieve this.

public boolean allOnes(Collection<Integer> values) {
    return values.parallelStream().allMatch(i -> i == 1);
}

Using a parallelStream will potentially yield better performance if there are multiple processors available.

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To my astonishment, all the solutions proposed so far are just plain wrong, or contain a subtle bug, or could be more efficient.

Here's a solution that works fast whatever the kind of list is, and even if the list contains null elements:

public boolean listIsFilledWith(List<Integer> integers, int i) {
    Integer value = i; // transform the int into an Integer only once
    for (Integer element : integers) { // iterate using an iterator, to avoid performance problems with linked lists
        if (!value.equals(element)) { // value is not null, but element can be. Don't compare objects with == or !=
            return false; // return early
        }
    }
    return true;
}
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Use the .contains() method that tells you whether the value exists in the list : http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/List.html#contains%28java.lang.Object%29

myList.contains(1);

Note: it uses the .equals() method of the contained object (it might be useful in your future developments).

HIH M.

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3  
This is not actually answering his (poorly phrased) question. –  Nathaniel Ford Jul 19 '12 at 20:43
    
what do you understand then? (it is still better than looping with a for loop...) –  ZNK - M Jul 19 '12 at 20:46
    
That will tell him if some value is in the list, but not if all values in the list are that. –  Nathaniel Ford Jul 19 '12 at 20:47
    
@ZNK-M Your way just checks to see if the list contains the value. The OP wants to know how to check if EVERY element in the list is equal to the value. –  jrad Jul 19 '12 at 20:47
    
sorry, I skipped that. But in fact, I don't see the point of having a list that contains dozen of 1... anyway... –  ZNK - M Jul 19 '12 at 20:48

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