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Why does this not work:

class Myclass
include HTTParty

   def dosomething
     base_uri("some_url")
   end


end

The base_uri method is a class method of HTTParty. It works fine if I call it from my class, outside of any instance methods, or from a class method, but when try to call it from an instance method I get "NoMethodError: undefined method `base_uri' for #"

Why? Shouldn't there be some way to refer to the HTTParty class from within my instance method so I can call that HTTParty class method?

I could change it to a class method, but then every instance of my class would have the same value for base_uri.

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Why doesn't it work? Because that's not how Ruby works. Similarly, this doesn't work:

class Foo
  def self.utility_method; ...; end
  def inst_method
    utility_method  # Error! This instance has no method named "utility_method"
  end
end

You could work around this by just doing:

class MyClass
  include HTTParty
  def dosomething
    HTTParty.base_uri("some_url")
  end
end

Let's look deeper at how method lookup works with modules. First, some code:

module M
  def self.m1; end
  def m2; end
end

class Foo
  include M
end
p Foo.methods     - Object.methods #=> []
p Foo.new.methods - Object.methods #=> [:m2]

class Bar
  extend M
end
p Bar.methods     - Object.methods #=> [:m2]
p Bar.new.methods - Object.methods #=> []

class Jim; end
j = Jim.new
j.extend M
p j.methods       - Object.methods #=> [:m2]

As we see, you can use extend to cause an object (a class or instance) to use the 'instance' methods of a module for the object itself (instead of instances), but you cannot cause 'class methods' of the module to be inherited by anything. The closest you can get is this idiom:

module M2
  module ClassMethods
    def m1; end             # Define as an instance method of this sub-module!
  end
  extend ClassMethods       # Make all methods on the submodule also my own
  def self.included(k)
    k.extend(ClassMethods)  # When included in a class, extend that class with
  end                       # my special class methods

  def m2; end
end

class Foo
  include M2
end
p Foo.methods     - Object.methods #=> [:m1]
p Foo.new.methods - Object.methods #=> [:m2]

If the HTTParty module used the above pattern, and so made the base_uri method available on your MyClass, then you could do this:

class MyClass
  include HTTParty
  def dosomething
    self.class.base_uri("some_url")
  end
end

...but that's more work than just directly referencing the module owning the method.

Finally, because this might help you, here's a diagram I made some years ago. (It's missing some core objects from Ruby 1.9, like BasicObject, but is otherwise still applicable. Click for a PDF version. Note #3 from the diagram is particularly applicable.)

Ruby Method Lookup Flow

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. HTTParty.get works from within an instance method, but HTTParty.base_uri does not. Looks like that's because HTTParty defines self.get but not self.base_uri. So, I assume this means there's no way to use HTTParty with different base_uri's for different instances? – wadesworld Jul 19 '12 at 22:02
1  
@wadesworld base_uri sets that property on the class's singleton class. This means you should not be changing it dynamically because your code will no longer be threadsafe. There's nothing that requires you to set the base_uri though and you can just specify the URI in each request. – Peter Brown Jul 19 '12 at 22:36
    
@wadesworld As shown in the documentation for HTTParty::ClassMethods#base_uri, the module uses the exact pattern I described above. As such, the value is stored on the class, not the instance, and you would need to modify the library or repeatedly change the value per instance as appropriate. See my final example above and the link in this comment for how it was designed to be used. – Phrogz Jul 19 '12 at 22:37
    
I appreciate the responses and apologize for my newbishness. What's bothering me is that given this design, it seems like the convenience of base_uri is only useful if all requests go to the same place. If one wanted to use HTTParty from multiple objects with multiple websites which might be queried in any order, it appears one would have to always pass the host and credentials with each request and just ignore base_uri and basic_auth or else concurrency issues would arise. While that's doable, it doesn't seem very elegant, unless I'm missing something. – wadesworld Jul 19 '12 at 23:22
    
@wadesworld I'm with you here, this design is not cool, i already raise an issue on github to see what's about this design. – Shiva Wu Sep 29 '12 at 11:14
class Myclass
  include HTTParty

  def dosomething
    Myclass.base_uri("some_url")
  end

end
share|improve this answer

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