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In am working on something and came across code similar to the following:

#define MODULUS(a,b)        ((a) >= 0 ? (a)%(b) : (b)-(-a)%(b))

unsigned char w;
unsigned char x;
unsigned char y;
char z;

/* Code that assigns values to w,x and y.  All values assigned 
   could have been represented by a signed char. */

z = MODULUS((x - y), w);

It is my understanding that the arithmetic (x - y) will be accomplished prior to any type conversion and the macro will always evaluate to (a)%(b) -- as the result will be an unsigned char which is always greater than or equal to zero. However, the code functions as intended and I think that my understanding is flawed. So...

My questions are these:

  1. Does an implicit type conversion to signed char occur before the expression is evaluated?

  2. Is there a situation (for example, if the unsigned values were large enough that they could not be represented by a signed value) where the above code would not work?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Does an implicit type conversion to signed char occur before the expression is evaluated?

No, a conversion to int occurs before the expression x - y is evaluated¹. Thus the result can be negative.

Is there a situation (for example, if the unsigned values were large enough that they could not be represented by a signed value) where the above code would not work?

If sizeof int == 1, the integer promotion would promote the unsigned chars to unsigned ints, and that could produce wrong results because before the modulus by w, a modulus by UINT_MAX + 1 is performed due to unsigned arithmetic.

¹ The default integer promotion.

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Exactly what I was looking for... thank you! –  embedded_guy Jul 19 '12 at 21:43
    
C99 (sec 5.2.4.2.1, at least of the n1124 draft), requires INT_MIN to be less than or equal to -32767, and INT_MAX to be greater than or equal to 32767. So, at least in C99, sizeof(int) >= 2. –  sfstewman Jul 20 '12 at 0:39
    
@sfstewman CHAR_BIT can be greater than 8. If CHAR_BIT is 16 or larger, sizeof(int) can be 1. Unlikely, but possible. See here –  Daniel Fischer Jul 20 '12 at 0:53
    
That's fascinating. Thanks for the link. (Just answered the question that I asked in the previous version of this comment.) –  sfstewman Jul 20 '12 at 2:40
1  
@sfstewman In C, byte is the unit of storage a char takes. So a byte can be 32 bits, or 9, anything not smaller than 8. sizeof(type) gives the size in units of char, so by definition sizeof(char) is 1. Since the minimal specification requires int to have at least 16 bits, for CHAR_BIT >= 16, it is possible that sizeof(int) == 1. But that's pretty much a theoretical scenario, 8-bit chars are nowadays the rule, I don't think any hardware/OS newer than 25 years has a different char size. But the standard allows it. –  Daniel Fischer Jul 20 '12 at 2:54

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