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I would like to implement an Iterator in Java that behaves somewhat like the following generator function in Python:

def iterator(array):
   for x in array:
      if x!= None:
        for y in x:
          if y!= None:
            for z in y:
              if z!= None:
                yield z

x on the java side can be multi-dimensional array or some form of nested collection. I am not sure how this would work. Ideas?

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1  
So, basically you want to iterate over the values in z-dimension? –  JHollanti Jul 19 '12 at 22:26
    
Yes and optionally with some predicate filter like shown. –  Eqbal Jul 19 '12 at 22:43
    
Why don't you use recursion? –  philippe Jul 20 '12 at 0:03
    
I'm a bit too lazy to write a response right at the moment, but basically you'd need a custom iterator. –  JHollanti Jul 22 '12 at 21:59
    
BTW, you could also write this as (z for x in array if x is not None for y in x if y is not None for z in y if z is not None) –  tobias_k Jul 31 at 14:26

4 Answers 4

Had the same need so wrote a little class for it. Here are some examples:

Generator<Integer> simpleGenerator = new Generator<Integer>() {
    public void run() throws InterruptedException {
        yield(1);
        // Some logic here...
        yield(2);
    }
};
for (Integer element : simpleGenerator)
    System.out.println(element);
// Prints "1", then "2".

Infinite generators are also possible:

Generator<Integer> infiniteGenerator = new Generator<Integer>() {
    public void run() throws InterruptedException {
        while (true)
            yield(1);
    }
};

The Generator class internally works with a Thread to produce the items. By overriding finalize(), it ensures that no Threads stay around if the corresponding Generator is no longer used.

The performance is obviously not great but not too shabby either. On my machine with a dual core i5 CPU @ 2.67 GHz, 1000 items can be produced in < 0.03s.

Here's the code:

public abstract class Generator<T> implements Iterable<T> {

    private class Condition {
        private boolean isSet;
        public synchronized void set() {
            isSet = true;
            notify();
        }
        public synchronized void await() throws InterruptedException {
            try {
                if (isSet)
                    return;
                wait();
            } finally {
                isSet = false;
            }
        }
    }

    static ThreadGroup THREAD_GROUP;

    Thread producer;
    private boolean hasFinished;
    private final Condition itemAvailableOrHasFinished = new Condition();
    private final Condition itemRequested = new Condition();
    private T nextItem;
    private boolean nextItemAvailable;

    @Override
    public Iterator<T> iterator() {
        return new Iterator<T>() {
            @Override
            public boolean hasNext() {
                waitForNext();
                return !hasFinished;
            }
            @Override
            public T next() {
                waitForNext();
                if (hasFinished)
                    throw new NoSuchElementException();
                nextItemAvailable = false;
                return nextItem;
            }
            @Override
            public void remove() {
                throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
            }
            private void waitForNext() {
                if (nextItemAvailable || hasFinished)
                    return;
                if (producer == null)
                    startProducer();
                itemRequested.set();
                try {
                    itemAvailableOrHasFinished.await();
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    hasFinished = true;
                }
            }
        };
    }

    protected abstract void run() throws InterruptedException;

    protected void yield(T element) throws InterruptedException {
        nextItem = element;
        nextItemAvailable = true;
        itemAvailableOrHasFinished.set();
        itemRequested.await();
    }

    private void startProducer() {
        assert producer == null;
        if (THREAD_GROUP == null)
            THREAD_GROUP = new ThreadGroup("generators");
        producer = new Thread(THREAD_GROUP, new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    itemRequested.await();
                    Generator.this.run();
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    // No need to do anything here; Remaining steps in run()
                    // will cleanly shut down the thread.
                }
                hasFinished = true;
                itemAvailableOrHasFinished.set();
            }
        });
        producer.setDaemon(true);
        producer.start();
    }

    @Override
    protected void finalize() throws Throwable {
        producer.interrupt();
        producer.join();
        super.finalize();
    }
}
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There is no yield in Java, so you have to do all these things for yourself, ending up with ridiculous code as this one:

    for(Integer z : new Iterable<Integer>() {

        @Override
        public Iterator<Integer> iterator() {

            return new Iterator<Integer>() {

                final Integer[][][] d3 = 
                        { { { 1, 2, 3 }, { 4, 5, 6 }, { 7, 8, 9 } },
                        { { 10, 11, 12 }, { 13, 14, 15 }, { 16, 17, 18 } },
                        { { 19, 20, 21 }, { 22, 23, 24 }, { 25, 26, 27 } } };

                int x = 0; 
                int y = 0; 
                int z = 0;

                @Override
                public boolean hasNext() {
                    return !(x==3 && y == 3 && z == 3);
                }

                @Override
                public Integer next() {
                    Integer result = d3[z][y][x];
                    if (++x == 3) {
                        x = 0;
                        if (++y == 3) {
                            y = 0;
                            ++z;
                        }
                    }
                    return result;
                }

                @Override
                public void remove() {
                    throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
                }
            };
        }
    }) {
        System.out.println(z);
    }

But if your sample would have more than one single yield it would end up even worse.

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I wish Java had generator/yield, but since it doesn't using Iterators is probably your best bet.

In this example I stuck with arrays, but in general I would advise using Iterable Collection instead, eg. List. In the example I show how it's pretty easy to get iterators for arrays though:

package example.stackoverflow;

import com.sun.xml.internal.xsom.impl.scd.Iterators;

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Iterator;

public class ArrayGenerator<T> implements Iterable<T> {
    private final T[][][] input;

    public ArrayGenerator(T[][][] input) {
        this.input = input;
    }


    @Override
    public Iterator<T> iterator() {
        return new Iter();
    }

    private class Iter implements Iterator<T> {
        private Iterator<T[][]> x;
        private Iterator<T[]> y;
        private Iterator<T> z;

        {
            x = Arrays.asList(input).iterator();
            y = Iterators.empty();
            z = Iterators.empty();
        }

        @Override
        public boolean hasNext() {
            return z.hasNext() || y.hasNext() || x.hasNext();
        }

        @Override
        public T next() {
            while(! z.hasNext()) {
                while(! y.hasNext()) {
                    y = Arrays.asList(x.next()).iterator();
                }
                z = Arrays.asList(y.next()).iterator();
            }
            return z.next();
        }

        @Override
        public void remove() {
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException("remove not supported");
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for(Integer i :
                new ArrayGenerator<Integer>(
                        new Integer[][][]{
                          {
                            {1, 2, 3},
                            {4, 5}
                          },
                          {
                            {},
                            {6}
                          },
                          {
                          },
                          {
                            {7, 8, 9, 10, 11}
                          }
                        }
                )) {
            System.out.print(i + ", ");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Indeed Java has no yield, but you can now use Java 8 streams. IMO it's really a complicated iterator since it's backed by an array, not a function. Given it's a loop in a loop in a loop can be expressed as a Stream using filter (to skip the nulls) and flatMap to stream the inner collection. It's also about the size of the Python code. I've converted it to an iterator to use at your leisure and printed to demonstrate, but if all you were doing was printing, you could end the stream sequence with forEach(System.out::println) instead of iterator().

public class ArrayIterate
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        Integer[][][] a = new Integer[][][] { { { 1, 2, null, 3 },
                                                null,
                                                { 4 }
                                              },
                                              null,
                                              { { 5 } } };

        Iterator<Object> iterator = Arrays.stream(a)
                                          .filter(ax -> ax != null)
                                          .flatMap(ax -> Arrays.stream(ax)
                                               .filter(ay -> ay != null)
                                               .flatMap(ay -> Arrays.stream(ay)
                                               .filter(az -> az != null)))
                                          .iterator();

        while (iterator.hasNext())
        {
            System.out.println(iterator.next());
        }
    }
}

I'm writing about implementation of generators as part of my blog on Java 8 Functional Programming and Lambda Expressions at http://thecannycoder.wordpress.com/ which might give you some more ideas for converting Python generator functions into Java equivalents.

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