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I was wondering if someone could help me with this SQL statement?

Say, I have an SQL Server 2008 table like this:

id -- INT PRIMARY KEY
dtIn -- DATETIME2
dtOut -- DATETIME2
type -- INT

id  dtIn    dtOut    type
1   05:00   10:00    1
2   08:00   16:00    2
3   02:00   08:00    1
4   07:30   11:00    1
5   07:00   12:00    2

I need to remove any time overlaps in the table above. This can be illustrated with this diagram: enter image description here

So I came up with this SQL:

UPDATE [table] AS t 
SET dtOut = (SELECT MIN(dtIn) FROM [table] WHERE type = t.type AND t.dtIn >= dtIn AND t.dtIn < dtOut) 
WHERE type = t.type AND t.dtIn >= dtIn AND t.dtIn < dtOut

But it doesn't work. Any idea what am I doing wrong here?

*EDIT*

OK, it took me awhile to get to this. Seems to be a working SQL for what I need it for:

--BEGIN TRANSACTION;

--delete identical dtIn
DELETE dT1
FROM tbl dT1
WHERE EXISTS
(
    SELECT *
    FROM tbl dT2
    WHERE dT1.Type = dT2.Type
    AND dT1.dtIn = dT2.dtIn
    AND (
            dT1.dtOut < dT2.dtOut
            OR (dT1.dtOut = dT2.dtOut AND dT1.id < dT2.id)
        )
);

--adjust dtOuts to the max dates for overlapping section
UPDATE tbl
SET dtOut = COALESCE((
    SELECT MAX(dtOut)
    FROM tbl as t1
    WHERE t1.type = tbl.type
    AND t1.dtIn < tbl.dtOut 
AND t1.dtOut > tbl.dtIn
    ), dtOut);

-- Do the actual updates of dtOut
UPDATE tbl
SET dtOut = COALESCE((
    SELECT MIN(dtIn)
    FROM tbl as t2
    WHERE t2.type = tbl.type AND
          t2.id <> tbl.id AND
          t2.dtIn >= tbl.dtIn AND t2.dtIn < tbl.dtOut
    ), dtOut);

--COMMIT TRANSACTION;
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just off the top of my head I believe that one of Joe Celko's books had this as an example problem. You might find the excerpt available on Google.

This might be closer. I think you weren't really doing the subquery the right way.

UPDATE table
SET dtOut = (
    SELECT MIN(t2.dtIn)
    FROM [table] as t2
    WHERE t2.id <> table.id AND t2.type = table.type
        AND table.dtIn < t2.dtIn AND t2.dtIn < table.dtOut
        AND table.dtOut <= t2.dtOut
    )
WHERE EXISTS (
    SELECT 1
    FROM [table] as t3
    WHERE
            t3.type = table.type
        AND t3.id <> table.id
        AND table.dtIn < t3.dtIn AND t3.dtIn < table.dtOut
        AND table.dtOut <= t3.dtOut
    )

EDIT I overlooked the id column at the top of the page so obviously that's a better check than making sure the endpoints don't match up. The solution is probably easier if you can assume that no two rows of identical type have the dtIn.

Btw, there's no reason to use a CROSS APPLY when a subquery will do exactly the same job.

EDIT 2 I did some quick testing and I think my query handles the scenario in your diagram. There's one case where it might not do what you want.

For a given type, think about the final two segments S1 and S2 in order of start time. S2 starts after S1 but also imagine it ends before S1 does. S2 is fully contained in the interval of S1, so it's either ignorable or the information for the two segments needs to be split into a third segment and that's where the problem gets trickier.

So this solution just assumes they can be ignored.


EDIT 3 based on the comment about combining updates

SQLFiddle posted by OP

-- eliminate redundant rows
DELETE dT1 /* FROM tbl dT1 -- unnecessary */
WHERE EXISTS
(
    SELECT *
    FROM tbl dT2
    WHERE dT1.Type = dT2.Type AND dT1.dtIn = dT2.dtIn
    AND (
        dT1.dtOut < dT2.dtOut
        OR (dT1.dtOut = dT2.dtOut AND dT1.id < dT2.id)
    )
);

--adjust dtOuts to the max dates
UPDATE tbl
SET dtOut = COALESCE((
    SELECT MAX(dtOut)
    FROM tbl as t1
    WHERE t1.type = tbl.type
    ), dtOut);

-- Do the actual updates of dtOut
UPDATE tbl
SET dtOut = COALESCE((
    SELECT MIN(dtIn)
    FROM tbl as t2
    WHERE t2.type = tbl.type AND
          t2.id <> tbl.id AND
          t2.dtIn >= tbl.dtIn AND t2.dtIn < tbl.dtOut
    ), dtOut);

Either one of the two updates below should replace the two updates above.

UPDATE tbl
SET dtOut = (
    SELECT
        COALESCE(
            MIN(dtIn),
            /* as long as there's no GROUP BY, there's always one row */
            (SELECT MAX(dtOut) FROM tbl as tmax WHERE tmax.type = tbl.type)
        )
    FROM tbl as tmin
    WHERE tmin.type = tbl.type

        AND tmin.dtIn > tbl.dtIn
        /*  
        regarding the original condition in the second update:
            t2.dtIn >= tbl.dtIn AND t2.dtIn < tbl.dtOut

        dtIns can't be equal because you already deleted those
        and if dtIn was guaranteed to be less than dtOut it's
        also automatically always less than max(dtOut)
        */
);

UPDATE tbl
SET dtOut = COALESCE(
  (
    SELECT MIN(dtIn) FROM tbl as tmin
    WHERE tmin.type = tbl.type AND tmin.dtIn > tbl.dtIn
  ),
  (        
    SELECT MAX(dtOut) FROM tbl as tmax
    WHERE tmax.type = tbl.type
  )
);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I need to try it out. Just from curiosity, what book and where in it is the code reference you mentioned? –  ahmd0 Jul 19 '12 at 22:55
    
I'm thinking Chapter 29 from Joe Celko's SQL for Smarties: Advanced SQL Programming. I could see the table of contents not the chapters. –  shawnt00 Jul 19 '12 at 23:05
    
Also for the same row check, wouldn't it be easier to check id column instead? –  ahmd0 Jul 19 '12 at 23:06
1  
I'm sure it would. I just overlooked that. One of your biggest problems is definitely that you didn't exclude the current row from matching in the subquery. But I think you were also trying to references the subquery's table in the outer WHERE clause. Maybe mine gets you on the right track, but I know it's not quite right. –  shawnt00 Jul 19 '12 at 23:07
1  
Well, in case of S2 contained within S1 it gets consumed by S1. My multi-part SQL seems to handle it: sqlfiddle.com/#!3/89b6c/2 Unfortunately I don't have enough SQL skills to consolidate it into one statement. –  ahmd0 Jul 21 '12 at 17:03
show 3 more comments

I think CROSS APPLY might do the trick:

DECLARE @T TABLE (ID INT, DTIn DATETIME2, dtOut DATETIME2, Type INT)
INSERT @T VALUES
(1, '05:00', '10:00', 1),
(2, '08:00', '16:00', 2),
(3, '02:00', '08:00', 1),
(4, '07:30', '11:00', 1),
(5, '07:00', '12:00', 2)

UPDATE  @T
SET     DtOut = T3.DtOut
FROM    @T T1
        CROSS APPLY
        (   SELECT  MIN(DtIn) [DtOut]
            FROM    @T T2
            WHERE   T2.Type = T1.Type
            AND     T2.DtIn > T1.dtIn 
            AND     T2.DtIn < T1.dtOut
        ) T3
WHERE   T3.dtOut IS NOT NULL

SELECT  *
FROM    @T
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. I'm not clear though -- what is the last SELECT * FROM @T for? –  ahmd0 Jul 19 '12 at 23:21
    
I just left it in from testing to show the data. It has no bearing on the update statement. –  GarethD Jul 19 '12 at 23:23
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