Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This week, I messed around with Chromium's Socket API a bit. But there's something which isn't really clear to me about this bad documented experimental interface.

What The docs on Google Code Say:

... about sendTo() at the moment:

Writes data on the given socket.

  1. socketId ( integer ) The socketId.

  2. data ( ArrayBuffer ) The data to write.

  3. address ( string ) The address of the remote machine.

  4. port ( integer ) The port of the remote machine.

  5. SendToCallback ( function )

But the description of sendTo() is exactly the same as the description of write() (write - Writes data on the given socket.). It's the same about recvFrom() and read() - both of them have got exactly the same description (read - Reads data from the given socket. / recvFrom - Reads data from the given socket.). But nobody says interesting anything about the differences.

What I Found Out:

It doesn't matter what I'm doing, sendTo always returns the following object:

  • [-] Object
    • bytesWritten: -2
    • [+] __proto__: Object

If I use write instead of sendTo in all these situations, everything happens as expected.

It's the same with recvFrom() and read() - read() is working as expected and recvFrom() fails.

My Question(s):

  • What is sendTo() for and what's the difference between write() and sendTo()?
  • What is recvFrom() for and what's the difference between read() and recvFrom()?
  • Why are there so many akin methods?
  • And: Is there anywhere some more information about the Socket API? The Google Code docs are really lightweight. Aren't there any articles on chromium.org concerning that?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
My best guess is that sendTo is for use with sockets that have not participated in a connect operation. Does sendTo work if you do not connect the socket? –  apsillers Jul 20 '12 at 18:31
    
@apsillers I did some trials concerning that and the only situation when sendTo worked was when I applied that method on a bound UDP socket. I can't find any information about that on Google Code or chrome.org, but I think that there isn't any use case for sendTo on TCP sockets at the moment. –  fridojet Jul 20 '12 at 19:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Apologies for the confusion. We are rolling out an improvement to the documentation based on your question.

The Chrome socket API is a thin layer over a subset of the POSIX sockets API. It follows the convention that read()/write() are for connected sockets, and sendto()/recvfrom() are for non-connected sockets. At the risk of oversimplifying, you'll want to use the former for connected-oriented protocols (TCP), and the latter for connectionless protocols (UDP). There's a good comparison of why one would choose TCP vs. UDP in the Wikipedia article on UDP.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Just one question concerning that: Why are the TCP method names different to the UDP method names? Is there a special reason or did you just take the names from POSIX? –  fridojet Jul 25 '12 at 13:19

I don't know much about sockets but I think the docs are mixed up, and sendTo is used when a connection is being initiated from the browser (or the other way around maybe, and the other should be used when a client initiates a socket connection into the browser but I don't see any SocketServer support anywhere so... anyway). From source (check out the parameters):

  • write()

      // Writes data on the given socket.
      // |socketId| : The socketId.
      // |data| : The data to write.
      // |callback| : Called when the first of any of the following happens: the
      // write operation completes without blocking, the write operation blocked
      // before completion (in which case onEvent() will eventually be called with
      // a <code>writeComplete</code> event), or an error occurred.
      static void write(long socketId,
                        ArrayBuffer data,
                        WriteCallback callback);
    
  • sendTo()

      // Writes data on the given socket.
      // |socketId| : The socketId.
      // |data| : The data to write.
      // |address| : The address of the remote machine.
      // |port| : The port of the remote machine.
      // |callback| : Called when the first of any of the following happens: the
      // write operation completes without blocking, the write operation blocked
      // before completion (in which case onEvent() will eventually be called with
      // a <code>writeComplete</code> event), or an error occurred.
      static void sendTo(long socketId,
                         ArrayBuffer data,
                         DOMString address,
                         long port,
                         SendToCallback callback);
    

You have the rest of the documentation in the link I gave you (experimental_socket.idl).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. Everything I tried out until now speaks in the favor of your assumption. So I think recvFrom()/sendTo() is inoperable for TCP sockets at the moment. –  fridojet Jul 20 '12 at 20:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.