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I wrote an awk script and now I am in the process of modularizing the same. I will just give a simple instance of what I have doe.

awk 
BEGIN
{
     declaring local variables 
}

{
      if(variable==A)
      {
            array[A]++;
            array1[A]++;
      }

}
END
{
      print contents of array and array1
}

I would like to do like the below using functions, I am just editing the action block, which is

{
      addArrays(A);
}

function addArrays(A)
{
       array[A]++;
       array1[A]++;
}

If I do like this I just want to know whether array and array1 contents can be accessed in the END statement. my doubt is whether array 1 and array 2 are locally declared inside the function. IF it is a local array . I just need to know how to make this as a global array so that I will be able to use this in the END function. Thank you.

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Did you try that? Did it work? –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Jul 19 '12 at 23:44

1 Answer 1

Variables and arrays are global in AWK. The only way variables are made local is by naming them in the argument list (even if values are not passed in for all the arguments. So to avoid creating a local array, don't include its name in the argument list.

From the gawk manual:

Argument names are not distinguished syntactically from local variable names. Instead, the number of arguments supplied when the function is called determines how many argument variables there are. Thus, if three argument values are given, the first three names in PARAMETER-LIST are arguments and the rest are local variables.

It follows that if the number of arguments is not the same in all calls to the function, some of the names in PARAMETER-LIST may be arguments on some occasions and local variables on others. Another way to think of this is that omitted arguments default to the null string.

Usually when you write a function, you know how many names you intend to use for arguments and how many you intend to use as local variables. It is conventional to place some extra space between the arguments and the local variables, in order to document how your function is supposed to be used.

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Thanks for your comments. So the change in array and array1 inside the function will be reflected at the end rite . That is I can get the updated value of array rite at the END statements –  NandaKumar Jul 19 '12 at 23:37
    
@NandaKumar: That is right, the values of these arrays will still be available in the END block as long as you don't explicitly make them local. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 20 '12 at 2:13

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