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I am using the ASP.NET Web API and controller classes to process JSON data from the client. I have run into a situation to where a single controller needs to have more than one Put method.

Example:

one my client I could have

var box = {size:2,color:'red',height:45,width:12}

Now if I wanted to update the entire box object I can do a

public void Put(Box box)
 {
 }

Ok, I got this much.

But I need to be able to update single values of the box as in:

    public void Put(int id, width value)
    {

    }
    public void Put(int id, height value)
    {

    }
    public void Put(int id, color value)
    {

    }

How would I map the extra Put verbs from with-in my .net c# controller?


I am going to add some more code for the bounty I've just created. I need someone to show me how to make the code that I'm supplying work. I need to have multiple methods mapping to one httpVERB PUT. Reason being I need to micro update items on the server. Like name, I do not want to send a large object over the wire to update one field, because my program will be connected to mobile devices as well.

---This code does not work and just returns the PutName and never the PutBrand. I've switched up the signatures just about any way that you can imagine as well.

    [AcceptVerbs("PUT")]
    [ActionName("PutBrand")]
    public HttpResponseMessage PutBrand(int id, int val)
    {
        return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.Created, "Brand");
    }
    [AcceptVerbs("PUT")]
    [ActionName("PutName")]
    public HttpResponseMessage PutName(IDString idString)
    {
        return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.Created, "Name");
    }
public class IDString
{
    public IDString() { }
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Value { get; set; }
}

----Client

   $.ajax(
                         {
                             url: "/api/project",
                             type: "PUT",
                             data: JSON.stringify({ id: 45, val:'xxx' }),
                             contentType: "application/json",
                             success: function (result) {

                             }
                         });

---Route config

 public class RouteConfig
    {
        public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes)
        {
            routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}");

            routes.MapHttpRoute(
                name: "DefaultApi",
                routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
                defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
            );

            routes.MapRoute(
                name: "Default",
                url: "{controller}/{action}/{id}",
                defaults: new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional }
            );
        }
    }

Proposed solution

              $.ajax(
                 {
                     url: "/api/project?a=name",
                     type: "PUT",

              $.ajax(
                 {
                     url: "/api/project?a=brand",
                     type: "PUT",

              $.ajax(
                 {
                     url: "/api/project?a=size",
                     type: "PUT",

Of course I would use a variable in the place of the a=myJavaScriptVariable

     public HttpResponseMessage Put(Project project)
        {



  string update = HttpContext.Current.Request.QueryString["a"];
        switch (update)
        {
            case "name":
                break;
            case "brand":
                break;
            case "size":
                break;

            default:
                break;
        }
        return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.Accepted);
    }
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The HTTP verb is not the name of the action, it's an annotation.

This way, your controller shoud look like this:

[VERB]
public ActionResult SomeMeaningfulName(ARGUMENTS)
{
//...
}

Where VERB is either HttpDelete, HttpPost, HttpPut or HttpGet

Hope this helps.

Regards


Update: my above answer is true for a ASP.NET MVC app. However, if we're talking about a WebAPI app, then there is another option to set the verb of an action: WebAPI uses a convention that understands the action name as the verb, as long as its a valid HTTP verb. The action may even have a meaningful name, but it must begin with the verb. More info at this post.

Thanks to @Anand for pointing this out (and the effort to make me understand =) ).

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1  
ASP.NET Web API will try to guess the method if you start the action name with Get, Post, Put or Delete. What you have written about is asp.net MVC. With Web API(convention), you can even simply name your action method as Put, Get, Post and Delete. –  Anand Jul 24 '12 at 2:40
    
Does it support multiple methods, like GetPen, GetPencil and so on? –  Andre Calil Jul 24 '12 at 2:47
    
Well, first think of this GetPen - you are asking for a resource Pen. So your URL would change and hence your controller. –  Anand Jul 24 '12 at 3:03
    
You didn't answered my question. Besides this, event though your point is valid, it does not invalidate my answer. So if you has been the one the voted me down, I believe you are being way too precious. –  Andre Calil Jul 24 '12 at 3:11
1  
@Anand you're right, thanks for your attention. Updated the answer –  Andre Calil Jul 24 '12 at 4:21
show 1 more comment

You can use ActionName attribute so that all the actions with this attribute can be called with same name.

[ActionName("Put")]
 public void PutWidth(int id, width value)
    {

    }
[ActionName("Put")]
    public void PutHeight(int id, height value)
    {

    }
[ActionName("Put")]
    public void PutColor(int id, color value)
    {

    }
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, my dam PUT method is not being called. My post is but not my PUT verb. I have it simplified down to public void Put(int xx){} and I keep getting a 404. I am new to webAPI and i am not actually displaying anything for a view to be called. I just need to webapi to act alone. Got any idea as to why the put verb is not being called? –  Vinyl Windows Jul 20 '12 at 1:37
    
have you added [HttpPost] on the top to every actions? Looks like Andre has already answered your question and my answer may not be relevant. –  Bishnu Paudel Jul 20 '12 at 2:35
    
This is really weird. My get and post methods work fine; however, I cannot get the put and delete verbs to work at all. I keep getting this error: PUT storefrontsystemm.net/api/project 404 (Not Found) . The domain in the url is one that i am using to work locally with iis7.5. At first I thought it was because I was working with the built in server so I move the app over to iis7.5 and I keep getting that error. This may be a permissions issue. Do you guys know where I can look to get this thing going? This is the first time Ive worked with webAPI so I may need to turn something on r off –  Vinyl Windows Jul 20 '12 at 2:58
    
Thanks for the help. This answered my question and created another. I'll start another thread for the verb mapping issue. –  Vinyl Windows Jul 20 '12 at 14:51
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To be honest with you, your solution move towards RPC style of coding rather than Rest Style of coding.

Think about your URLs first for doing your CRUD functionality.

"/box/{id}"

This should be suffice to do your all of your CRUD functionality. Further more the matching semantics for Web API follows the rule below

  1. It matches the name of the action with the verb
  2. Matches for method signature(so you can have 2 get , 1 parameterless and other with parameter)

If you have methods with same verb and same signature then at best, the method defined first gets called.

I could understand your reason to make multiple methods for put, as you must be updating a single proptery of box at one time. It could be achieved with little trick over as following. From client only send the values that are updated. For example, say only height is changed. So the send the following Box object to the server

//send only Id and height
var data = {size:null,color:null,height:45,width:null,id: 91}
 $.ajax(
                         {
                             url: "/api/project",
                             type: "PUT",
                             data: JSON.stringify(data),
                             contentType: "application/json",
                             success: function (result) {

                           }
                     });

And on server check which fields are null before updating it. My Code assumes you are using Entity Frame work but it be written in same for any DB.

public void Put(Box box)
{
   //fetch the item from DB
   var item = _db.Box.First(i => i.id = box.id);
   if(item == null)
     // If you can't find the box to update
    throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.NotFound);

   //check for properties if not null
   if(box.height != null)
      item.height= box.height;
   if(box.width!= null)
      item.width= box.width;
   if(box.color!= null)
      item.color= box.color;
   if(box.size!= null)
      item.size= box.size;  
   //update the item in database
  _db.SaveChanges();
  return new HttpResponseMessage<Box>(HttpStatusCode.Accepted);
}
share|improve this answer
    
What I am really after here is performance. These updates are going to be stacked, and hitting the server, "From the same client and many other clients". It will be possible for the same property of the same box to be updated right after the previous update. It would make my life a lot easier to have the Box object as the parameter. In this situation it may make the most since to pass the box as a parameter and append a queryString as the update to take place. Please look at the code I've added above and give me your input of performance. –  Vinyl Windows Jul 23 '12 at 15:48
    
@VinylWindows : Seems alright. You used query string to check for the variable that's been updated, where as I was using null to check for the parameter that was updated. One thing I would like to know, you are pressing on performance so much. Can I ask, what kind of traffic you are expecting. If its very huge, then my dear friend probably you have think in some other direction of implementing your feature. –  Anand Jul 24 '12 at 2:50
    
Think about this situation when you have huge requests coming for update on Single Entity(Project or Box). Now since the requests would be making update statement on your underlying database, that means either locking the entire table(even worse) or locking the row(still worse) because other update are waiting to update the entities value. Could result in deadlocks and time out. Have you thought about this situation ? –  Anand Jul 24 '12 at 2:51
    
For scenario like this(huge traffic) for update, the situation becomes tricky. The question then would be asked, how consistent you need your data ? Would you be satisfied if your data becomes eventually consistent ? –  Anand Jul 24 '12 at 2:55
    
I use with(nolock)on my select statements, but I am not sure if this is a good way to go on my update statements. To answer your question it is ok for the data to eventually become consistent. The deal on this situation for each user they can do back to back, stacked updates, but the row they're updating belongs to them and no one else will be able to update that record; however, there will be 100's all doing that type of updating. I am using a lock(_db) in my c# api code. what do you recommend for the sql? I am going to check out that link this evening, I haven't forgot about bounty,just busy –  Vinyl Windows Jul 25 '12 at 20:31
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