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I want to understand how does memory leak checkers identify if a free has been called for a given malloc. malloc can easily be identified by brk system calls, so if i am writing a profiler and do a single stepping on a process which breaks at system calls i can easily understand that malloc has been done. How can i find if a free has been called for this malloc?

Below is the output from strace. This code has free, how can we tell if free was invoked by checking this strace -

read(0, "13608\n", 4096)                = 6
brk(0)                                  = 0x8cc6000
brk(0x8ce7000)                          = 0x8ce7000
write(1, "File name - /proc/13608/maps\n", 29) = 29
open("/proc/13608/maps", O_RDONLY)      = 3
fstat64(3, {st_mode=S_IFREG|0444, st_size=0, ...}) = 0
mmap2(NULL, 4096, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_ANONYMOUS, -1, 0) = 0x55559000
read(3, "00349000-00363000 r-xp 00000000 "..., 4096) = 1046
write(1, "ptr1-ffd1f49a\n", 14)         = 14
write(1, "ptr2-ffd1f4a8\n", 14)         = 14
write(1, "Buffer read - 00349000-00363000 "..., 102) = 102
write(1, "\n", 1)                       = 1
write(1, "ptr1-ffd1f49a\n", 14)         = 14
write(1, "ptr2-ffd1f4aa\n", 14)         = 14
write(1, "Buffer read - 00367000-004a6000 "..., 104) = 104
write(1, "\n", 1)                       = 1
write(1, "ptr1-ffd1f49a\n", 14)         = 14
write(1, "ptr2-ffd1f4bd\n", 14)         = 14
write(1, "Buffer read - 08048000-08049000 "..., 123) = 123
write(1, "\n", 1)                       = 1
write(1, "ptr1-ffd1f49a\n", 14)         = 14
write(1, "ptr2-ffd1f4a1\n", 14)         = 14
write(1, "Buffer read - ffad8000-ffaf1000 "..., 95) = 95
write(1, "\n", 1)                       = 1
write(1, "ptr1-ffd1f479\n", 14)         = 14
write(1, "ptr2-ffd1f479\n", 14)         = 14
write(1, "Buffer read - ffffe000-fffff000 "..., 55) = 55
write(1, "\n", 1)                       = 1
read(3, "", 4096)                       = 0
close(3)                                = 0
munmap(0x55559000, 4096)                = 0
write(1, "Starting Address - 00349000\n", 28) = 28
write(1, "Ending Address - 00363000\n", 26) = 26
write(1, "Permissions - r-xp\n", 19)    = 19
write(1, "Offset - 00000000\n", 18)     = 18
write(1, "PathName - </lib/ld-2.5.so>\n", 28) = 28
write(1, "\n", 1)                       = 1
write(1, "\n", 1)                       = 1
write(1, "Starting Address - 00367000\n", 28) = 28
write(1, "Ending Address - 004a6000\n", 26) = 26
write(1, "Permissions - r-xp\n", 19)    = 19
write(1, "Offset - 00000000\n", 18)     = 18
write(1, "PathName - </lib/libc-2.5.so>\n", 30) = 30
write(1, "\n", 1)                       = 1
write(1, "\n", 1)                       = 1
write(1, "Starting Address - 08048000\n", 28) = 28
write(1, "Ending Address - 08049000\n", 26) = 26
write(1, "Permissions - r-xp\n", 19)    = 19
write(1, "Offset - 00000000\n", 18)     = 18
write(1, "PathName - </fs_user/samirba/myP"..., 49) = 49
write(1, "\n", 1)                       = 1
write(1, "\n", 1)                       = 1
write(1, "Starting Address - ffad8000\n", 28) = 28
write(1, "Ending Address - ffaf1000\n", 26) = 26
write(1, "Permissions - rw-p\n", 19)    = 19
write(1, "Offset - 7ffffffe6000\n", 22) = 22
write(1, "PathName - <[stack]>\n", 21)  = 21
write(1, "\n", 1)                       = 1
write(1, "\n", 1)                       = 1
write(1, "Starting Address - ffffe000\n", 28) = 28
write(1, "Ending Address - fffff000\n", 26) = 26
write(1, "Permissions - r-xp\n", 19)    = 19
write(1, "Offset - ffffe000\n", 18)     = 18
write(1, "PathName - <EMPTY>\n", 19)    = 19
write(1, "\n", 1)                       = 1
write(1, "\n", 1)                       = 1
exit_group(0)                           = ?
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no one to one relationship between a malloc call and a system call. Typically, a malloc library will get big blocks from the OS using e.g. brk system call or mmap system call. Then these big block(s) will be cut in smaller blocks to serve successive malloc calls. A free will usually not cause a system call (e.g. munmap) to be called. So, you cannot really track malloc and free at system call level.

Valgrind can track the memory leaks because it intercepts (and replaces) malloc, free, ... The Valgrind replacements functions are maintaining a list of allocated blocks.

Real leaks (i.e. memory which cannot be reached anymore, i.e. all pointers to it have been lost/erased) are found by Valgrind using a scan of all the active memory.

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When we invoke memcheck tool of valgrind, it does not require program to instrumented by valgrind flags during compilation but still it can figure out how many mallocs and free were called. I want to understand how it figures out the number of frees called. –  Samir Baid Aug 17 '12 at 1:17
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AFAIK, the memory blocks allocated by OS are identified by the starting address. So look for free() that is called with the same argument, which was returned by malloc() previously. As strace logs more low-level mmap and brk calls, use ltrace to log high-level library calls, keeping eye at the return values and arguments.

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if i am tracing a process for example using strace, i will not see malloc, i'll only see brk in the output. Below is the output from strace, This code has free. How can you tell looking at the output that free was called? PLease see my edited question above –  Samir Baid Jul 19 '12 at 23:54
    
try ltrace program –  spacediver Jul 20 '12 at 4:51
    
ok... ltrace works fine as it shows free... but if i am writing a profiler and it is doing a ptrace on the process than i can identify what system calls are happening... Is there any way i can find the free using a system call? –  Samir Baid Jul 20 '12 at 15:25
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