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My database is in MySQL.

Assume I have the following table:

id         number
1          45
2          25
3          66
4          43
......
......
......
30         54
31         21

etc ... etc.

I want to have a query like so:

select * from myTable where number = 25

but I want to also include 2 more items, one above it and one below it (based on ID).

the result set of my query would turn up with the following result set: 1, 2, 3.

If I selected the number 66, then the result set would include 2, 3, 4. Etc, etc.

The idea would be to range the query by saying, hey, I want anything that has an ID equal to 1 minus this queries' id, and also one plus this queries' id.

I hope this makes sense.

Any help would be great.

Thanks!

P.S. The point of this is to capture events in a log so that I can see what happened before and after a certain event happened

share|improve this question
1  
is number unique? What should happen if the 25 appears more than once in the table? –  ypercube Jul 20 '12 at 0:18
    
number is not unique. If 25 appears twice, the the total number of results would be six. –  Kyle Jul 20 '12 at 0:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
SELECT t.*
FROM 
    myTable AS t
  JOIN
    ( SELECT id
      FROM myTable
      WHERE number = 25
    ) AS my
  ON t.id BETWEEN my.id - 1 AND my.id + 1 ;

Notice that this will not show 3 rows if your ids have gaps.

Also, if the number you choose (25 in the example) appears more than once (but k times), the result will be 3*k rows.


If there are gaps, as expected, in the id column, you can use this:

SELECT *
FROM 
  ( SELECT t.*
    FROM 
        myTable AS t
      JOIN
        ( SELECT MIN(id) AS id
          FROM myTable
          WHERE number = 25
        ) AS my
      ON t.id <= my.id 
    ORDER BY t.id DESC 
      LIMIT 2
  ) AS a

UNION ALL

SELECT *
FROM
  ( SELECT t.*
    FROM 
        myTable AS t
      JOIN
        ( SELECT MIN(id) AS id
          FROM myTable
          WHERE number = 25
        ) AS my
      ON t.id > my.id 
    ORDER BY t.id ASC 
      LIMIT 1
  ) AS b ;

If there are gaps in the id column and the number is not unique so the parameter (25) can appear more than once (but say k times), you can have a query that returns 3*k rows (almost all the times):

SELECT t.*
FROM 
    myTable AS t
  JOIN
    ( SELECT id
      FROM myTable
      WHERE number = 25
    ) AS ti
  ON t.id =
     ( SELECT tt.id
       FROM myTable AS tt
       WHERE tt.id < ti.id
       ORDER BY tt.id DESC
         LIMIT 1
     ) 
  OR t.id = ti.id
  OR t.id =
     ( SELECT tt.id
       FROM myTable AS tt
       WHERE tt.id > ti.id
       ORDER BY tt.id ASC
         LIMIT 1
     ) ;
share|improve this answer
    
answerers of your level might provide proof answer, that doesn't rely on consecutive ids ;-) –  zerkms Jul 20 '12 at 0:08
    
@zerkms: Is that ok? It seems we posted almost identical answers :) –  ypercube Jul 20 '12 at 0:19
    
yep, great now. PS: I like your LIMIT 2 with <= trick –  zerkms Jul 20 '12 at 0:20
    
Perfect, thanks! –  Kyle Jul 20 '12 at 0:53

Not sure if it will work (I remember there are some limitations on ORDER BY and LIMIT in UNIONed queries, but don't have mysql instance to check it), but what if you try:

(SELECT t2.id
FROM myTable t1
INNER JOIN myTable t2 ON t2.id > t1.id
WHERE t1.number = 25
ORDER BY t2.id
LIMIT 1)

UNION ALL

(SELECT t2.id
FROM myTable t1
INNER JOIN myTable t2 ON t2.id < t1.id
WHERE t1.number = 25
ORDER BY t2.id DESC
LIMIT 1)
share|improve this answer
SELECT * FROM table WHERE id IN (SELECT id, id-1, id+1 FROM table WHERE number=25)
share|improve this answer
1  
No one guaranteed id to be strictly consecutive –  zerkms Jul 20 '12 at 0:07
    
This query is broken anyway. –  ypercube Jul 20 '12 at 0:08
    
oops, I just saw another question with auto_increment and confused it with this one :/ –  cegfault Jul 20 '12 at 0:09

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