Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to send the user input received through a text box and then send that input to a javascript, which is an another file (myfile.js). For some reason the html part is not working. Here is the code: myfile.js:

var TRange=null;

function findString (str) {
 if (parseInt(navigator.appVersion)<4) return;
 var strFound;
 if (window.find) {

  // CODE FOR BROWSERS THAT SUPPORT window.find

  strFound=self.find(str);
  if (!strFound) {
   strFound=self.find(str,0,1);
   while (self.find(str,0,1)) continue;
  }
 }
 else if (navigator.appName.indexOf("Microsoft")!=-1) {

  // EXPLORER-SPECIFIC CODE

  if (TRange!=null) {
   TRange.collapse(false);
   strFound=TRange.findText(str);
   if (strFound) TRange.select();
  }
  if (TRange==null || strFound==0) {
   TRange=self.document.body.createTextRange();
   strFound=TRange.findText(str);
   if (strFound) TRange.select();
  }
 }
 else if (navigator.appName=="Opera") {
  alert ("Opera browsers not supported, sorry...")
  return;
 }
 if (!strFound) alert ("String '"+str+"' not found!")
 return;
}

search.html

<!DOCTYPE html>
<HTML>
<HEAD>
</head>
<title>Search</title>
<body>
<script src="myfile.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<form name="input">

Search for: <input type="text" id ="keytex" name="keytext" onClick='if(document.getElementById("keytex").value!=\'\') findString(document.getElementById("keytex").value); return(false);'>
</form>
<p> You can search this text. Search the text again</p>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
2  
Everything about this is terrible practice. Never use browser sniffing, never bind your click events directly in your html! –  James South Jul 20 '12 at 0:59
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Um... Did you even check your HTML? (There are many errors in your code, here's one.)

<input onClick='if(document.getElementById("keytex").value!=\'\') findString(document.getElementById("keytex").value); return(false);'>

See those \'? You can not do that in HTML. Plus, use brackets if(){} in inline codes.

This should works:

if(document.getElementById("keytex").value!="")

PS: Don't use inline JavaScript. They will only give you a messier HTML at the end.

//Good
document.querySelector("#keytex").addEventListener("click",function(){
    if(this.value!=""){             //Use "this" to refer back the element.
        findString(this.value);
    }
    return false;
});

Learn more about:

share|improve this answer
    
Use document.getElementById("keytex").addEventListener("click",function(){. –  uınbɐɥs Jul 20 '12 at 2:24
    
@ShaquinTrifonoff - I used querySelector there is just because of laziness. Sure getElementById is better. –  Derek 朕會功夫 Jul 20 '12 at 3:28
add comment

probably you want to use onchange or onkeyup events - not onclick

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.