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For example:

int StrLen(const std::string &s = "default string") {
  const std::string &t = "another string";  // BTW, is this line safe?
  return s.size();
}

Update

SoapBox's conclusion is correct, but the reason is not completely right.

the lifetime of the temporary is automatically extended to be the same as the reference that holds it.

This is usually true with several exceptions. One is that

"A temporary bound to a reference parameter in a function call persists until the completion of the full-expression containing the call."

I think this exception applys for the default argument case.

Another exception is related to the additional example in SoapBox's answer:

"The lifetime of a temporary bound to the returned value in a function return statement is not extended; the temporary is destroyed at the end of the full-expression in the return statement."

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2  
You probably should read GotW #88: A Candidate For the “Most Important const. –  Jesse Good Jul 20 '12 at 2:36
    
@JesseGood Yeah, that's worth reading. One may want to make a comparison between the first example in GotW #88 and SoapBox's example. The former is a correct common use, while the latter is a common mistake. –  updogliu Jul 20 '12 at 12:29
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, both of those things are safe to do. They construct temporary objects, and the lifetime of the temporary is automatically extended to be the same as the reference that holds it.

While we're on the subject though, this is a common mistake with temporaries that is not safe.

std::string const &accessor() const {
    if (my_name_is_valid())
        return m_my_name;
    else
        return "";
}

This is invalid because the temporary is created inside the accessor function and then a reference to it is returned. The caller will receive a reference to a destructed object... which is undefined behavior, and will usually cause a crash.

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About the additional example, I think it should be "receive a reference which is going to be destructed". Both the returned reference and the "" object referred by it are going to be destructed after evaluation of the calling expression. –  updogliu Jul 20 '12 at 1:29
2  
@updogliu references are not objects, and thus not destroyed. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 20 '12 at 1:59
    
Yeah, I'm wrong. The string("") will be destroyed when the function exists. See my Update in the question. –  updogliu Oct 2 '12 at 2:12
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SoapBox's answer is right, however it's not always obvious what the limitations are.

This is usually true with several exceptions. One is that "A temporary bound to a reference parameter in a function call persists until the completion of the full-expression containing the call." I think this exception applies for the default argument case.

It does, though sometimes in subtle ways, consider these two examples:

struct A { A(std::string const& s): _ref(s) {} std::string const& _ref; };

struct B { B(std::string s): _ref(s) {} std::string const& _ref; };

In both examples the function is a constructor.

  • In A: the lifetime of the temporary is extended until the end of the full expression means that A a("Hello"); std::cout << a._ref << "\n"; is not safe. The temporary only lived until the first ;.
  • In B: the parameter itself is a temporary, and here there is no binding to const-reference at all. A good compiler will warn though.

Another exception is related to the additional example in SoapBox's answer: "The lifetime of a temporary bound to the returned value in a function return statement is not extended; the temporary is destroyed at the end of the full-expression in the return statement."

This one stems from the way the return statement works in general. There is, underneath, two copies ongoing as far as the Standard is concerned. That is:

  1. Invoking return will copy the result into the "result slot"
  2. The caller will copy the value in the "result slot" into its storage, if any.

Of course, copies can be optimized away (copy elision), but this is important because the lifetime of the temporary is only extended as far as the original const-reference it was bound to. If a copy of that reference exceeds the original's lifetime, then it refers to garbage, and that is what occurs on a return statement.

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Yes. The string is allocated as static text and won't move or change.

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3  
That's not correct. An string object is constructed on every call of function StrLen in the example. –  updogliu Jul 20 '12 at 1:52
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