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I have a tab delimited file (inpFile.txt) as

field1  field2
aaa1  aaa2
aaa1  bbb2
aaa1  ccc2 
ccc1  ddd2
eee2  aaa2

I want to read it and store it into hash ( hashname )

Once my hash is ready I want to search if a ($key, $value) pair is found or not. For example, if (eee2, aaa2) is found or not?

I am a starter in Perl but I know that it can be done efficiently in Perl and is easy.

I wrote the following code. Can you please extend it further?

Thanks

#!/usr/local/bin/perl

open (LIST1, "/inpFile.txt") || die "File not found\n";
     while (<LIST1>) {
          ($tmpvar1, $tmpvar2) = split(/\t/, $_);
          $hashname{$tmpvar1} = $tmpvar2;
     }
close(LIST1);
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

Since your data contains keys with multiple values, and assuming that's actually the case in your data file, you can create a hash of arrays (HoA), where a key is associated with an array:

use Modern::Perl;

my %hashname;

while (<DATA>) {
    my ( $key, $value ) = split;
    push @{ $hashname{$key} }, $value;
}

my $searchKey = 'aaa1';
my $searchVal = 'ccc2';

if ( defined $hashname{$searchKey}
    and $searchVal ~~ @{ $hashname{$searchKey} } )
{
    say "key: $searchKey with val: $searchVal found.";
}
else {
    say "key: $searchKey with val: $searchVal not found.";
}

__DATA__
aaa1  aaa2
aaa1  bbb2
aaa1  ccc2 
ccc1  ddd2
eee2  aaa2

Searching for a 'key/value' pair is done by first seeing if the key exists, and then using the smart match operator to see if the value exists within the array that's associated with the key.

Output:

key: aaa1 with val: ccc2 found.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

Firstly, I interpret your question to be specific to dupes on Keys/Values pairs. This is slightly awkward -- the normal question is just to test for the key, but we can do key-value by making both the key and value the input to a function that generates anew key.

If you're just using a tab-deliminated CSV, use Text::CSV and rest assured that it's done right and the most complex cases are covered! Install Text::CSV_XS to make it very fast too.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;
use Text::CSV;
use IO::Handle;

my $csv = Text::CSV->new({sep_char=>"\t"});
my $fh = IO::Handle->new_from_fd( *DATA, 'r' );

while ( not $fh->eof ) {
  my $row = $csv->getline( $fh );
  warn Dumper $row;
}

__DATA__
aa1 aaa2
aaa1  bbb2
aaa1  ccc2 
ccc1  ddd2
eee2  aaa2

After you understand that, the rest of the exercise is also simple. I use a very simple algo that sha1'ed the key and value concatenated the two and indexed a hash by that. This eliminates crafty attempts at collisions but may not be necessary for your task. Feel free to ask questions.

use feature ':5.10';
use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;
use Text::CSV;
use IO::Handle;
use Digest::SHA qw(sha1_hex);

my $csv = Text::CSV->new({sep_char=>"\t"});
my $fh = IO::Handle->new_from_fd( *DATA, 'r' );

my ( %kv, %sha1_kv );
while ( not $fh->eof ) {
  my $row = $csv->getline( $fh );
  my ($k, $v) = @$row;

  my $sha1 = sha1_hex($k) . sha1_hex($v);

  if ( exists $sha1_kv{ $sha1 } ) {
    say "We have a hit (key/value dupe) for $sha1 [key: $k]";
  }
  else {
    $kv{ $k } = $v;
    $sha1_kv{ $sha1 } = $v;
  }

  warn Dumper $row;
}

__DATA__
aa1 aaa2
aa1 aaa2
aaa1  bbb2
aaa1  ccc2 
ccc1  ddd2
eee2  aaa2
share|improve this answer

First when you met with Perl, use pragma use strict;.

I notice that you file consists

aaa1  aaa2
aaa1  bbb2

during processing our file, hash will store only one key 'aaa1' => 'bbb2', because Perl has unique key in hash.

use strict;

open my $fh, '<', '/input_file.txt' 
    or die "Cant open file $!";

LINE:
while (my $line = <$fh>) {
    my ($key, $value) = split /\t/, $line;
    next LINE if not $key;

    $hash{$key} = $value;
}

my $search_key   = 'eee2';
my $search_value = 'aaa2';

if ($hash{$search_key} eq $search_value) {

   print "Found key: $search_key and value: $search_value in hash /n";
}

close $fh;
share|improve this answer
    
Actually my data is having the same form that i mentioned. Is this possible to have different values for the same key. Or is there any other method to do this efficiently. My file is more than gigs. –  learner Jul 20 '12 at 3:51
    
You will have to then add another level to hash or add prefix/suffix to the keys that are the same. –  Hameed Jul 20 '12 at 3:54

YOur input file will result in only three element hash because the keys are duplicated. In real life you have to deal with that kind of situation, however in this case I change your input file:

aaa1    aaa2
bbb1    bbb2
ccc1    ccc2
ccc1    ddd2
eee2    aaa2

Here is some enhancement to your code:

#!/usr/local/bin/perl

#always use strict and warnings
use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

hash_test();
#Try to put your code in separate subs if possible 
sub hash_test {
   my %hashname = ();
   read_into_hash( \%hashname );
   print Dumper( \%hashname );    # Test your hash
   search_hash( \%hashname, "eee2", "aaa2" );
}

sub read_into_hash {

   #Always declare variables
   my $list1;
   my $tmpvar1;
   my $tmpvar2;
   my $hash_ref = shift;
   my $lineno = 0;
   open( $list1, "<", "/inpFile.txt" ) or die "File not found\n";
   while (<$list1>) {
       $lineno++;
       chomp;    #delete new line character
       ( $tmpvar1, $tmpvar2 ) = split( /\t/, $_ );
       if (defined $hash_ref->{$tmpvar1})
       {
         # adding lineno from file to avoid overwriting. I use '~' just in case
         # if your keys could include such character, use something else
         $tmpvar1 .= "~" . $lineno;
       }
       $hash_ref->{$tmpvar1} = $tmpvar2;

   }

   close($list1);
}

sub search_hash {
   my $hash_ref = shift;
   my $key      = shift;
   my $value    = shift;

   if (defined $hash_ref->{$key} && $hash_ref->{$key} =~ /^$value(\~\d+)*$/)
   {
           print "Found.\n";
       }
}
share|improve this answer
    
My data is having one key associated with multiple values. Ca this code deal with such situation? In my example, aaa1 is associated with aaa2, bbb2 and ccc2 all. Is this possible to have different values for the same key. Or is there any other method to do this efficiently. My file is more than gigs. –  learner Jul 20 '12 at 3:54
    
Changed the code to deal with the key duplication problem. The search sub is also changed. –  Hameed Jul 20 '12 at 3:57
    
Also note, the reason I am used print Dumper($hashname) to test the hash elements. Take that out if you process such a large file. –  Hameed Jul 20 '12 at 4:03
    
There is compilation error near the end of the code? –  learner Jul 20 '12 at 4:07
    
There is compilation error in last two lines –  learner Jul 20 '12 at 4:15

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