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In my Ms Access, I want to insert data from two different table, so i write the sql like this:

SELECT B.*, C.* INTO Table2 FROM Table1 AS A 
RIGHT JOIN ABC AS B ON A.HKID=B.HKID 
RIGHT JOIN DEF AS C ON A.HKID=C.HKID 
WHERE A.HKID Is Null and b.organization not like '*xxx*' and b.adj = 1 and c.[Status] = 'Suspend';"

but it had error msg when running the sql, it said syntax error.

Can I write the sql like this ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you have more than one JOIN, Access' db engine requires the use of parentheses.

SELECT B.*, C.* INTO Table2
FROM
    (Table1 AS A RIGHT JOIN ABC AS B ON A.HKID = B.HKID)
    RIGHT JOIN DEF AS C ON B.HKID = C.HKID
WHERE
        A.HKID Is Null
    AND B.organization Not Like '*xxx*'
    AND B.adj=1
    AND C.Status='Suspend';

Notice I used ...

RIGHT JOIN DEF AS C ON B.HKID = C.HKID

instead of the way you had it ...

RIGHT JOIN DEF AS C ON A.HKID=C.HKID

I had to make that change because Access complained "join not supported" when I tried ON A.HKID=C.HKID If that is not satisfactory, you will need to start over; I think I would tackle this one with the tables in the opposite order and use LEFT JOIN.

Also, the table you create (Table2) will include fields named B_HKID and C_HKID, which come from B.HKID and C.HKID. You will see the same pattern with any other field names those 2 tables have in common. If that is unacceptable you can list the fields individually and assign aliases where needed.

If you have Access installed, you should build this query in the query designer because it will ensure you set up the joins properly to keep the db engine happy.

If you don't have Access installed, and you are running this query from an ADO connection, change the wild card character in the Like string pattern from * to %.

AND B.organization Not Like '%xxx%'
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Hi, i had tried the sql, but it return "too many fields" error. –  Joe Yan Jul 20 '12 at 6:22
    
i found that the "too many fields" error occurs becoz my table had more than 175 column which over the limit of mdb. –  Joe Yan Jul 20 '12 at 8:01

that code is incorrect

INSERT INTO TABLE2
SELECT B.*, C.* FROM TABLEA AS A
 RIGHT JOIN ABC AS B ON A.HKID=B.HKID
 RIGHT JOIN DEF AS C ON A.HKID=C.HKID
WHERE A.HKID IS NULL and B.ORGANIZATION NOT LIKE '*xxx*' AND B.ADJ = 1 AND C.[STATUS] = 'SUSPEND';

Hope you know about right joins. What you are saying is return all records from C and B whether or not it matches with A. But I suppose your where reduces it to just return C and B when it doesn't match with A.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb208861(v=office.12).aspx

You don't have to specify columns in the insert since the select will do that for you:

"You can also use INSERT INTO to append a set of records from another table or query by using the SELECT … FROM clause as shown above in the multiple-record append query syntax. In this case, the SELECT clause specifies the fields to append to the specified target table."

EDIT: I believe the code below does the same but without the A.HKID IS NULL, might improve performance as well:

INSERT INTO TABLE2
SELECT B.*, C.* FROM TABLEA AS A
 INNER JOIN ABC AS B ON A.HKID<>B.HKID
 INNER JOIN DEF AS C ON A.HKID<>C.HKID
WHERE B.ORGANIZATION NOT LIKE '*xxx*' AND B.ADJ = 1 AND C.[STATUS] = 'SUSPEND';
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