Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

code like this:

var Policy={
    initialize:function(){
        return function(){
               this.initialize.apply(this,arguments);
        };
    }
};
var AjaxLoadingPolicy= Policy.initialize();//(1)
AjaxLoadingPolicy.prototype={
    initialize:function(name){
        this.name=name;
    }
};

Base on this code AjaxLoadingPolicy is a function with this.initialize.apply(this,arguments) in (1). But I don't really understand what this.initialize is. and why it can be defined in AjaxLoadingPolicy.prototype? Also, isn't that apply is used to apply the supperclass priorities to the instance?

share|improve this question
    
Hi Panda Yang!. –  Derek 朕會功夫 Jul 20 '12 at 4:59
    
Why the question is down voted? –  kiranvj Jul 20 '12 at 5:09
    
I don't know... –  Panda Yang Jul 20 '12 at 5:20
    
@Derek Hi Derek –  Panda Yang Jul 20 '12 at 5:20
1  
I have no idea why this is downvoted. –  RobG Jul 20 '12 at 6:18
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

At (1) in the code, the value of AjaxLoadingPolecy is assigned a reference to a new function object with the body:

function(){
    this.initialize.apply(this,arguments);
}; 

The value of this when that function is called can only be determined by seeing how it is called. If it is called simply as AjaxLoadingPolecy() then this will reference the global object (or undefined in strict mode).

The object assigned to AjaxLoadingPolecy.prototype has an initialize method that is inherited by instances of AjaxLoadingPolecy (i.e. objects created by new AjaxLoadingPolecy()), it is not inherited by AjaxLoadingPolecy itself.

Objects inherit from their constructor's public prototype (called the instance's internal [[Prototype]]), not their own public prototype.

Incidentally, in the OP, the following:

AjaxLoadingPolicy.prototype={
    initialize:function(name){
        this.name=name;
    }
};

is exactly the same as:

AjaxLoadingPolicy.prototype.initialize = function(name) {
    this.name=name;
};

The second uses the existing prototoype object, whereas the former replaces it (using more code and wasting the instantiation of an object).

apply is used to set a function's this and supply arguments. Javascript doesn't have classes (or super classes), though apply and call might be used when emulating that behaviour.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.