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for (int y = 0; y < GameBoard.GameBoardHeight; y++)
        for (int x = 0; x < GameBoard.GameBoardWidth; x++)
        {
            if (GetSquare(x, y) == "Empty")
            {
                 RandomPiece(x, y);
            }
        }

The first for loop has no braces, and the next line is not even a statement with a ;. It's just a for loop.

Whats up with this?

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this can be done if we are having only one line to execute... –  Hiren Soni Jul 20 '12 at 5:14
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6 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Enclose the statements to be iterated over in curly braces. If only one statement should be included in the loop, the curly braces can be omitted.

Opening and closing braces for if, for, or while statements should always be used even if the statement's body contains only a single statement.

Braces improve the uniformity and readability of code. More important, when inserting an additional statement into a body containing only a single statement, it is easy to forget to add braces because the indentation gives strong (but misleading) guidance to the structure.

for(int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) { Console.WriteLine(i) }

NOTE : After the loop. Without curly braces, only the first statement immediately after the for loop statement will be in the loop.

see this for more info: http://www.dotnetperls.com/omit-curly-brackets

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The body of a for loop without braces is just the next statement. In this case the second for loop is the statement that's the body of the first.

The grammar in the C# 4.0 spec (sections 8. and 8.8.3) looks like:

for-statement:
    for ( for-initializer; for-condition; for-iterator) embedded-statement

embedded-statement:
    block
    empty-statement
    expression-statement
    selection-statement
    iteration-statement
    jump-statement
    try-statement
    checked-statement
    unchecked-statement
    lock-statement
    using-statement 
    yield-statement

So the body of the for loop is defined to be an embedded-statement. When you see braces around the body of the loop that's a block which is the first option for the embedded-statement. Having another for loop as the embedded-statement is one of the options applicable to iteration-statement (section 8.8).

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MSDN: The for loop executes a statement or a block of statements repeatedly until a specified expression evaluates to false.

The main point to understand is the executes a statement or a block of statements part. The nested for in you example is a statement which contains a block of statements because of the { } pair.

So, if you wrote the above as only a single statement per nested operation, you will write:

for (int y = 0; y < GameBoard.GameBoardHeight; y++)
    for (int x = 0; x < GameBoard.GameBoardWidth; x++)
        if (GetSquare(x, y) == "Empty")
            RandomPiece(x, y);

or as a block statements per nested operation:

for (int y = 0; y < GameBoard.GameBoardHeight; y++)
{
    for (int x = 0; x < GameBoard.GameBoardWidth; x++)
    {
        if (GetSquare(x, y) == "Empty")
        {
            RandomPiece(x, y);
        }
    }
}
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A for loop is also a statement. So it's legal C# code. The control flow constructs (at least those inherited from C) can have either a single statement or a block of several statements:

for (...) statement
for (...) { statement* }
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A for loop body can contains statements (ex. loops, conditions) without braces.

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First for loop next statement is second for loop so your program goes well with your syntax even you write your syntax like this also:

for (int y = 0; y < GameBoard.GameBoardHeight; y++)
        for (int x = 0; x < GameBoard.GameBoardWidth; x++)        
            if (GetSquare(x, y) == "Empty")            
                 RandomPiece(x, y);
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