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I need to download excel file over http. The problem is that Chrome browser ignores file name that I'm setting in response header, while other browsers behave well.

resp.setHeader("Content-disposition:", "attachment; filename=grid.xls");

Chrome saves it as "excel.xls". How can I make chrome set file name? Thanks

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out of curiosity: what servlet implementation do you use? – Julian Reschke Jul 20 '12 at 9:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Obtain an HTTP trace, or test your site with

BTW: the trailing colon in the first parameter to setHeader looks fishy.

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I'd definitely use something like Fiddler or Wireshark to see exactly what the browser is receiving. Good pickup on the trailing colon. You shouldn't need it as set header will separate the key and value with the colon – Mr Moose Jul 20 '12 at 8:25
It was colon, thanks! – Timofei Davydik Jul 20 '12 at 8:30
Added test case at, showing that Safari and Chrome do the right thing here. – Julian Reschke Jul 20 '12 at 15:57

I'm just looking at something we do for downloading CSV files. We send down the following headers;

Cache-Control: no-cache,no-store,max-age=0
Pragma: No-cache
Content-Length: 312
Content-Type: application/csv;charset=UTF-8
Content-disposition: attachment; filename="MyCsvFileToSave.csv"

This works for us in Chrome. Is it possible that the charset might be the difference?

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No, the charset parameter on Content-Type applies to the payload, not the header fields. – Julian Reschke Jul 20 '12 at 9:41

Removing the trailing colon in the first parameter to setHeader fixed the issue.

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