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I have a class Playlist :

function Playlist() {
    this.episodes = [ /*episode list*/ ];
};

and I want to make a method displaying each episode :

Playlist.prototype.display = function() {
    $('.episodeList').each(function(index) {
        $(this).children('title').text(this.episodes[index].title);
    });
}

The problem is that the 'this' at the end, before '.episodes[index]' represent the dom object selected and not my playlist.

How can I solve this problem ? Thanks.

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marked as duplicate by Felix Kling, Esailija, codeXtre.me, kapa Jun 3 '14 at 14:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4 Answers 4

up vote -2 down vote accepted

A common practice in Javascript is to make a new variable for storing the current class, since the content of the this variable changes with context. Consider something like

    function Playlist()
    {
        var self = this;
        this.episodes = [/*episode list*/];

        this.display = function()
        {
            $('.episodeList').each(function(index) {
                $(this).children('title').text(self.episodes[index].title);
            });
        }
    };

for your Playlist class definition, and call myPlaylist.display() to display the content.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, it work. –  user1540114 Jul 20 '12 at 8:59
    
@user1540114 I assume you modified his code because it doesn't work the way he represented it. He is setting a global variable to the instance, so if you have multiple playlists it won't work. –  Esailija Jul 20 '12 at 9:06
    
That's a good point, edited. –  Zach Jul 20 '12 at 9:07
    
That still won't work. self is only local to the constructor function, it is not available in .display(). –  Felix Kling Jul 20 '12 at 9:16
    
You're right, I incorrectly thought using the prototype was equivalent to the code I've edited to. –  Zach Jul 20 '12 at 9:29

Bind the function to your context:

$('.episodeList').each($.proxy(function(index, elem) {
    $(elem).children('title').text(this.episodes[index].title);
}, this));

More on jQuery.proxy

share|improve this answer

If you use each on dom element, this inside each have reference to dom elements

For example:

Playlist.prototype.display = function(e)
{                                       
    $('.episodeList').each(function(index) {                                  
            console.log(this)                                       
    });
}

console.log prints dom element and it is correct. Now put console log outside each like this:

Playlist.prototype.display = function(e)
{   
    console.log(this)                            
    $('.episodeList').each(function(index) {                                  

    });
}

Now console.log should print PlayList function (your class). So "this" in each scope have reference to dom elements but this in Playlist.prototype.display scope have reference to Playlist function.

Solution is:

Playlist.prototype.display = function(e)
{   
    var self = this;                            
    $('.episodeList').each(function(index) {                                  
        console.log(self)
        console.log(this)                   
    });
}      

You need take "this" from Playlist scope and attribute to self var, so now self have refenrece to Playlist. Now you do each, so current this in each have reference to dom element but self variable still have reference to Playlist.

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In your code $(this)=episodes[index] because it's in the each function. I think this is what you want,

Playlist.prototype.display = function() {
  var element=$(this);

  $('.episodeList').each(function(index,item) {
        item.children('title').text(element.episodes[index].title);
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why would you pass a normal object to jQuery (var element=$(this);). If you remove the call to jQuery, it should be fine. –  Felix Kling Jul 20 '12 at 9:17

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