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Possible Duplicate:
What does 'unsigned temp:3' means

A struct's definition goes like this,

typedef struct
{   
    uint32_t length : 8;  
    uint32_t offset : 24;
    uint32_t type : 8;
} A;

I haven't seen this kind of definition before, what does it mean by :8 and :24?

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possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/q/4373839/1369241 –  sleekFish Jul 20 '12 at 9:46
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marked as duplicate by Kiril Kirov, Paul R, Andrejs Cainikovs, EJP, Blagovest Buyukliev Jul 20 '12 at 9:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's defining bitfields. This tells the compiler that length is 8 bits, offset is 24 bits and type is also 8 bits.

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Then why does it define length as uint32_t? –  Alcott Jul 20 '12 at 9:41
    
@Alcott That could only work if uint32_t was a typedef for 'unsigned' or 'unsigned int'. –  EJP Jul 20 '12 at 9:43
    
@EJP, sorry, don't quite understand –  Alcott Jul 20 '12 at 9:44
    
@Alcott Usually the type for bitfields is unsigned int (or just unsigned or even just int). You have to ask the author why he choose to use uint32_t (which in most cases is a typedef to unsigned int anyway). –  Joachim Pileborg Jul 20 '12 at 9:44
    
Understand, thanks, @JoachimPileborg. –  Alcott Jul 20 '12 at 9:51
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Refer the following link. They are bit-fields. http://www.cs.cf.ac.uk/Dave/C/node13.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bit_field

#include <stdio.h>

typedef unsigned int uint32_t;

#pragma pack(push, 1)
typedef struct
{
    uint32_t length : 8;
    uint32_t offset : 24;
    uint32_t type : 8;
} A;

typedef struct
{
    uint32_t length;
    uint32_t offset;
    uint32_t type;
} B;
#pragma pack(pop)

int main()
{
  printf("\n Size of Struct: A:%d   B:%d", sizeof(A), sizeof(B));
  return 0;
}

Structure A's size will be 5 Bytes where as B's size will be 12 bytes.

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This notation defines bit fields, i.e. the size in number of bits for that structure variable.

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