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How do I convert a dynamic object to a Dictionary<TKey, TValue> in C# What can I do?

public static void MyMethod(object obj)
{
    if (typeof(IDictionary).IsAssignableFrom(obj.GetType()))
    {
        // My object is a dictionary, casting the object:
        // (Dictionary<string, string>) obj;
        // causes error ...
    }
    else
    {
        // My object is not a dictionary
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
You check that your object is an IDictionary. So casting to that interface, like (IDictionary)obj, will succeed. There are many other IDictionary than Dictionary<string, string> though. So you better test the same type you want to cast to. I agree with Nikhil (answerer) that you want to use as in this case. I can provide details if needed. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 20 '12 at 9:54
    
In general consider the answers here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3481923/… (e.g. RouteValueDictionary) – Jacob Foshee Aug 3 '15 at 18:27
up vote 12 down vote accepted
    public static KeyValuePair<object, object > Cast<K, V>(this KeyValuePair<K, V> kvp)
    {
        return new KeyValuePair<object, object>(kvp.Key, kvp.Value);
    }

    public static KeyValuePair<T, V> CastFrom<T, V>(Object obj)
    {
        return (KeyValuePair<T, V>) obj;
    }

    public static KeyValuePair<object , object > CastFrom(Object obj)
    {
        var type = obj.GetType();
        if (type.IsGenericType)
        {
            if (type == typeof (KeyValuePair<,>))
            {
                var key = type.GetProperty("Key");
                var value = type.GetProperty("Value");
                var keyObj = key.GetValue(obj, null);
                var valueObj = value.GetValue(obj, null);
                return new KeyValuePair<object, object>(keyObj, valueObj);
            }
        }
        throw new ArgumentException(" ### -> public static KeyValuePair<object , object > CastFrom(Object obj) : Error : obj argument must be KeyValuePair<,>");
    }

From the OP:

Instead of converting my whole Dictionary, i decided to keep my obj dynamic the whole time. When i access the keys and values of my Dictionary with a foreach later, i use foreach(dynamic key in obj.Keys) and convert the keys and values to strings simply.

share|improve this answer

I use this helper:

public static class ObjectToDictionaryHelper
{
    public static IDictionary<string, object> ToDictionary(this object source)
    {
        return source.ToDictionary<object>();
    }

    public static IDictionary<string, T> ToDictionary<T>(this object source)
    {
        if (source == null)
            ThrowExceptionWhenSourceArgumentIsNull();

        var dictionary = new Dictionary<string, T>();
        foreach (PropertyDescriptor property in TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(source))
            AddPropertyToDictionary<T>(property, source, dictionary);
        return dictionary;
    }

    private static void AddPropertyToDictionary<T>(PropertyDescriptor property, object source, Dictionary<string, T> dictionary)
    {
        object value = property.GetValue(source);
        if (IsOfType<T>(value))
            dictionary.Add(property.Name, (T)value);
    }

    private static bool IsOfType<T>(object value)
    {
        return value is T;
    }

    private static void ThrowExceptionWhenSourceArgumentIsNull()
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source", "Unable to convert object to a dictionary. The source object is null.");
    }
}

the usage is just to call .ToDictionary() on an object

Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer

this should work:

for numbers, strings, date, etc.:

    public static void MyMethod(object obj)
    {
        if (typeof(IDictionary).IsAssignableFrom(obj.GetType()))
        {
            IDictionary idict = (IDictionary)obj;

            Dictionary<string, string> newDict = new Dictionary<string, string>();
            foreach (object key in idict.Keys)
            {
                newDict.Add(key.ToString(), idict[key].ToString());
            }
        }
        else
        {
            // My object is not a dictionary
        }
    }

if your dictionary also contains some other objects:

    public static void MyMethod(object obj)
    {
        if (typeof(IDictionary).IsAssignableFrom(obj.GetType()))
        {
            IDictionary idict = (IDictionary)obj;
            Dictionary<string, string> newDict = new Dictionary<string, string>();

            foreach (object key in idict.Keys)
            {
                newDict.Add(objToString(key), objToString(idict[key]));
            }
        }
        else
        {
            // My object is not a dictionary
        }
    }

    private static string objToString(object obj)
    {
        string str = "";
        if (obj.GetType().FullName == "System.String")
        {
            str = (string)obj;
        }
        else if (obj.GetType().FullName == "test.Testclass")
        {
            TestClass c = (TestClass)obj;
            str = c.Info;
        }
        return str;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
myTypes[0] and myTypes[1] will be always System.Object. it would help alot to track the types of my dictionary, but it doesnt seems to work. i even need to convert the dictionary to <string, string> at the end, however thx. – modiX Jul 20 '12 at 11:09
    
it was my fault , to get the types you have to do it with idictionary IDictionary idict = (IDictionary)obj; Type[] myTypes = idict.GetType().GetGenericArguments(); Dictionary<object, object> dict = idict.Cast<dynamic>().ToDictionary(entry => entry.Key, entry => entry.Value); – user1519979 Jul 20 '12 at 11:33
    
have updatet my post, maybe it helps – user1519979 Jul 20 '12 at 11:48
    
i see, ofc it helps, but its dependent to the given types i pre-code. ive to program independent classes that require to work well with all kinds of types in a Dictionary, even those the programmer creates. Im working on a library I must provide, so. – modiX Jul 20 '12 at 13:55
    
the biggest problem i think is that you have to know how to convert an unknown object to a string. maybe you can force programmers to override the ToString() method in their own classes. e.g.: public abstract class Test { public abstract String ToString(); } class TestClass : Test { public override string ToString() { return "This is a test"; } } so you can check if the object is a type of the abstract class and then use the tostring method otherwise you will get allways the classname with tostring(not very usefull in my opinion) :) – user1519979 Jul 23 '12 at 9:46
   public static void MyMethod(object obj){
   Dictionary<string, string> dicEditdata = data as Dictionary<string, string>;
   string abc=dicEditdata["id"].ToString();} 

suppose--- if you place the cursor over the object(obj) while debugging and if you get an object with the value {['id':'ID1003']} then you can use the value as

string abc=dicEditdata["id"].ToString(); 
share|improve this answer

Assuming key can only be a string but value can be anything try this

public static Dictionary<TKey, TValue> MyMethod<TKey, TValue>(object obj)
{
    var stringDictionary = obj as Dictionary<TKey, TValue>;

    if (stringDictionary!= null)
    {
        return stringDictionary;
    }
    var baseDictionary = obj as IDictionary;

    if (baseDictionary != null)
    {
        var dictionary = new Dictionary<TKey, TValue>();
        foreach (DictionaryEntry keyValue in baseDictionary)
        {
            if (!(keyValue.Value is TValue))
            {
                // value is not TKey. perhaps throw an exception
                return null;
            }
            if (!(keyValue.Key is TKey))
            {
                // value is not TValue. perhaps throw an exception
                return null;
            }

            dictionary.Add((TKey)keyValue.Key, (TValue)keyValue.Value);
        }
        return dictionary;
    }
    // object is not a dictionary. perhaps throw an exception
    return null;

}
share|improve this answer

As I understand it, you're not sure what the keys and values are, but you want to convert them into strings?

Maybe this can work:

public static void MyMethod(object obj)
{
  var iDict = obj as IDictionary;
  if (iDict != null)
  {
    var dictStrStr = iDict.Cast<DictionaryEntry>()
      .ToDictionary(de => de.Key.ToString(), de => de.Value.ToString());

    // use your dictStrStr        
  }
  else
  {
    // My object is not an IDictionary
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
it get an invalid cast exception if obj is a Dictionary<string, int> (doesnt contain any null keys or values). it seems it got problems to cast the number into a string. – modiX Jul 20 '12 at 10:40
    
it even throws an invalid cast exception, if i deliver a Dictionary<string, string> on that line. however, thx for the hint, it might be near of my solution. – modiX Jul 20 '12 at 10:54
    
Hmm, it's also an ugly solution. Where does obj come from? If only we knew that it was always a Dictionary<,> of some kind, we could make MyMethod generic, and all would be simple and beautiful. The trouble with IDictionary is that it could also be a Hashtable or many other types that are non-generic. And the foreach object type is not even the same (the reason why my answer did not work). – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 20 '12 at 11:48
    
obj can be any object, just a number (int), any own class i dont kno, any list that contains classes, or in this case, any Dictionary with any unknown classes. my method already works by delivering a dynamic obj and later to convert it to string to store the dictionary as xml (since XmlSerializer hates Dictionaries). now i got some more trouble and reading it and delivering it back without any errors, i might create a new question then later. thank you. – modiX Jul 20 '12 at 14:00
object parsedData = se.Deserialize(reader);
System.Collections.IEnumerable stksEnum = parsedData as System.Collections.IEnumerable;

then will be able to enumerate it!

share|improve this answer

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