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Below is the SQL Query I am trying to translate

SELECT dbo.Contracts.Supplier 
FROM dbo.Contracts INNER JOIN dbo.Products ON dbo.Contracts.Product = dbo.Products.Product
where dbo.Products.ProductGroup='Crude'
GROUP BY dbo.Contracts.Supplier

Am I doing something wrong because I do not get same results with the following LINQ

     var result = from c in context.Contracts
                     join p in context.Products on c.Product equals p.Product1
                     where p.Product1.Equals("Crude")
                     group c by c.Supplier into g    
                     select new { supplier = g.Key  };

It is generating a weird statement

SELECT 
1 AS [C1], 
[Distinct1].[Supplier] AS [Supplier]
FROM ( SELECT DISTINCT 
[Extent1].[Supplier] AS [Supplier]
FROM [dbo].[Contracts] AS [Extent1]
WHERE N'Crude' = [Extent1].[Product]
)  AS [Distinct1]

Using distinct would work but to get same results, LINQ should be generating a statement like so (it's like it is ignoring the join):

SELECT distinct dbo.Contracts.Supplier 
FROM dbo.Contracts INNER JOIN dbo.Products ON dbo.Contracts.Product = dbo.Products.Product
where dbo.Products.ProductGroup='Crude'
share|improve this question
2  
If you're only interested in products where p.Product1 is "Product1" why don't you filter that out before the grouping? –  Jon Skeet Jul 20 '12 at 10:02
    
Wondering why you need grouping in this case. –  hazzik Jul 20 '12 at 10:03
    
We're converting an Access application to an ASP.NET MV3 web site (using entity framework as data layer) so the above query is generated from Access and I am just translating what was there! ... or at least trying to for now. –  gmang Jul 20 '12 at 10:05
    
and the grouping by is to get a distinct list of supplier who supply that product and YES I change the where clause to filter before grouping, however same results. –  gmang Jul 20 '12 at 10:10
1  
Hm your LINQ query does not contain the identifier ProductGroup. Ist that ok? Shouldn't you be filtering on it? –  usr Jul 20 '12 at 11:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm assuming that you are using 'EntityFramework' or 'Linq To SQL'. If so, you should be able to use navigation properties to navigate to product and filter invalit results out. This way your query might look something like this:

var result = (from c in context.Contracts
              where c.Products.Any(p => p.ProductGroup == "Crude")
              select c.Supplier).Distinct();

It will automatically convert into correct query (in this case possibly without join even, just using Exists sql keyword) and return distinct suppliers. This is if I understand your objective correctly - you want to obtain all suppliers assigned to contracts that contain product from 'Crude' product group.

Basically you should try to avoid using joins from linq to sql or linq to entities as much as possible when you can use navigation properties. System will probably be better at converting them into specific sql.

share|improve this answer
    
It was a stupid mistake and I was using the wrong column, thank you for your second set of eyes! That was it....the where clause was on ProductGroup and not product. Oppps :) –  gmang Jul 20 '12 at 13:37
    
I downloaded LINQPAD and that made it easier to troubleshoot –  gmang Jul 20 '12 at 13:39

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