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I am writing android app that makes AES encryption/decryption of files. I want to be able to detect if incorrect password is specified and thus not matching key is derived for decryption. I am using AES/CBC/PKCS7Padding with 256 bit key. If I do cipher.doFinal() I can try/catch the BadPaddingException and it tells me that something is wrong and probably key was incorrect. But if I use CipherInputStream to read encrypted file, I get no feedback on correctness of padding. So if I deliberately specify incorrect password it decrypts file, then reports that everything is ok, however decrypted file is a total junk. So my question is how to detect bad padding when using CipherInputStream?

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What KDF are you using? –  CodesInChaos Jul 21 '12 at 11:33
    
I am using PBEWithSHA256And256BitAES-CBC-BC –  Alex Amiryan Jul 22 '12 at 8:50

6 Answers 6

Prepend some known header to your data. Decrypt it first and if it doesn't match what you expected, stop and return error.

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That would work if the entire message or key is affected, otherwise it would be a poor mans CRC. Personally I would rather fix the issue itself (see my second answer) and then use GCM mode encryption. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 21 '12 at 17:46
1  
The purpose of this is not to be a CRC, just make it easier/faster to check whether they have the right key/password. GCM or CBC+HMAC can be used to make sure the whole message has not been modified. If they derive a key from a password, they could use some sort of key checksum/hash as well to verify the password quickly. –  Nikolay Elenkov Jul 22 '12 at 3:05
    
I think I will extend CipherInputStream and modify it to throw BadPaddingException, because padding verification is totally acceptable for me, that's why I didn't used HMAC authentication when was initially developing my app. –  Alex Amiryan Jul 22 '12 at 8:48
    
Well, you know your app best, but what happens when someone, say, strips a few blocks of your data, and it decrypts correctly, but is actually incomplete? –  Nikolay Elenkov Jul 22 '12 at 13:11
    
Your known data approach would work as an indicator and it certainly would work better than just relying on padding (which would go wrong at least 1/256 times). That said, if you can add data I would rather use an authentication tag (GCM) or an additional HMAC (which requires a different key from the one you are using for encryption). CBC has the interesting property that errors are only introduced within two blocks if a bit is flipped. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 22 '12 at 13:57

Try and use GCM mode instead (Java 7 or Bouncy Castle provider). The trick with padding is that sometimes it is correct after the message has been altered (once in 256 times, approximately). GCM mode will add intergrity protection, so any alteration will result in an exception derived from BadPaddingException.

One thing though: you should prepend a (random) nonce when encrypting with GCM (actually a rule for CBC mode too, but the implications of using a non-random IV in CBC are less severe).

Note that you need to perform the final calculation to get a badpaddingexception, so don't forget to close or end the underlying stream. This is probably your current issue.

[EDIT]: this is not the answer, but the input could be used to generate a better CipherInputStream, see my other answer on this question.

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Thanks for suggestion, but it results success every time not once in 256. I read across code of CipherInputStream and it catches BadPaddingException when processing final block and just returns that stream is over. Maybe I need to somehow modify the code of CipherInputStream class? –  Alex Amiryan Jul 20 '12 at 11:50
    
If you have NoPadding set, then your code will never catch faulty padding. Check that your decryption code is set for PKCS7. –  rossum Jul 20 '12 at 12:12
    
Of course it is set to PKCS7Padding. That's why I am asking this question. –  Alex Amiryan Jul 20 '12 at 13:51
    
Sorry, that does of course not help, undelying InputStream should be closed or at the end instead. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 20 '12 at 19:44
    
@rossum seems that CipherInputStream swipes this exception under the table (which smells like pretty bad design to me), look at my other answer. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 22 '12 at 1:37

I think bad padding is caught for some reason, this is from the CipherInputStream source:

private int getMoreData() throws IOException {
    if (done) return -1;
    int readin = input.read(ibuffer);
    if (readin == -1) {
        done = true;
        try {
            obuffer = cipher.doFinal();
        }
        catch (IllegalBlockSizeException e) {obuffer = null;}
        catch (BadPaddingException e) {obuffer = null;}
        if (obuffer == null)
            return -1;
        else {
            ostart = 0;
            ofinish = obuffer.length;
            return ofinish;
        }
    }
    try {
        obuffer = cipher.update(ibuffer, 0, readin);
    } catch (IllegalStateException e) {obuffer = null;};
    ostart = 0;
    if (obuffer == null)
        ofinish = 0;
    else ofinish = obuffer.length;
    return ofinish;
}
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This is probably to handle the exception correctly, streams are not supposed to throw security exceptions. Note that my previous answer included GCM mode, but this will not help as the exception resulting from bad integrity is a BadPaddingException as well. Maybe take the CipherInputStream and rewrite it - wrap the BadPaddingException into an IOException instead to comply with the contract. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 21 '12 at 11:34
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is modified version of getMoreData() method in CipherInputStream, it maybe useful for someone who faced my problem:

private int getMoreData() throws IOException {
    if (done) return -1;
    int readin = input.read(ibuffer);
    if (readin == -1) {
        done = true;
        try {
            obuffer = cipher.doFinal();
        }
        catch (IllegalBlockSizeException e) {
            throw new IOException(e);
        }
        catch (BadPaddingException e) {
            throw new IOException(e);
        }
        if (obuffer == null)
            return -1;
        else {
            ostart = 0;
            ofinish = obuffer.length;
            return ofinish;
        }
    }
    try {
        obuffer = cipher.update(ibuffer, 0, readin);
    } catch (IllegalStateException e) {obuffer = null;};
    ostart = 0;
    if (obuffer == null)
        ofinish = 0;
    else ofinish = obuffer.length;
    return ofinish;
}
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1  
Could you pretty please at least upvote my answer that includes the source? –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 30 '12 at 0:08

I ran into this as well. I had a test that reliably fails a couple of times out of a thousand runs with AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding that is supported in Java.

To fix, you can do as suggested above and use bouncy castle.

However, I did a different fix and simply added a md5 content hash to the plain text before encrypting that I verify on decrypt. Simply append the content to the md5 hash and on decrypt grab the first 22 characters of the md5 hash and verify that the rest of the string has the same hash and throw an exception if it doesn't or return the plaintext (without md5 hash) if it does match. This will work regardless of the encryption algorithm. Probably with GCM mode this is indeed not needed though. Anyway, this way you can avoid extra dependencies on bouncy castle.

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I had the same issue, how to know if the key used to encrypt is the same that used to decrypt, because in my case I could decrypt the strings but it returned some garbage, and i need to know the encrypted string(its random) to get the correct value.

So what i have done is;

Decrypt the encrypted string.
Encrypt the String again using the correct key.
Decrypt the previous encrypted string.
Match if the original decrypted key equals the new decrypted key.

    Cipher c = Cipher.getInstance(algorithm);
    c.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, keyspec, ivspec);
    byte[] decValue = c.doFinal(encryptedData.getBytes());
    decryptedValue = new String(decValue,"UTF-8");

  //now i have the string decrypted in decryptedValue

  byte[] encryptAgain = encrypt(decryptedValue);
  String encryptAgaindecripted = new String(c.doFinal(encryptAgain),"UTF-8");

  //if keys match then it uses the same key and string is valid
 if (decryptedValue.equals(encryptAgaindecripted)){
  //return valid
 }

hope this helps someone.

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