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So, what I intended to do is to fetch a list of entries/posts with their category and user details, AND each of its total published comments. (entries, categories, users, and comments are separate tables)

This query below fetches the records fine, but it seems to skip those entries with no comments. As far as I can see, the JOINs are good (LEFT JOIN on the comments table), and the query is correct. What did I miss ?

SELECT entries.entry_id, entries.title, entries.content,
entries.preview_image, entries.preview_thumbnail, entries.slug,
entries.view_count, entries.posted_on, entry_categories.title AS category_title,
entry_categories.slug AS category_slug, entry_categories.parent AS category_parent,
entry_categories.can_comment AS can_comment, entry_categories.can_rate AS can_rate,
users.user_id, users.group_id, users.username, users.first_name, users.last_name,
users.avatar_small, users.avatar_big, users.score AS user_score, 
COUNT(entry_comments.comment_id) AS comment_count

FROM (entries)
JOIN entry_categories ON entries.category = entry_categories.category_id
JOIN users ON entries.user_id = users.user_id
LEFT JOIN entry_comments ON entries.entry_id = entry_comments.entry_id

WHERE `entries`.`publish` = 'Y'
AND `entry_comments`.`publish` = 'Y'
AND `entry_comments`.`deleted_at` IS NULL
AND `category` = 5

GROUP BY entries.entry_id, entries.title, entries.content,
entries.preview_image, entries.preview_thumbnail, entries.slug,
entries.view_count, entries.posted_on, category_title, category_slug,
category_parent, can_comment, can_rate, users.user_id, users.group_id,
users.username, users.first_name, users.last_name, users.avatar_big,
users.avatar_small, user_score

ORDER BY posted_on desc

edit: I am using MySQL 5.0

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, you're doing a left join on entry_comments, with conditions:

`entry_comments`.`publish` = 'Y'
`entry_comments`.`deleted_at` IS NULL

For the entries with no comments, these conditions are false. I guess this should solve the problem:

WHERE `entries`.`publish` = 'Y'
AND (
        (`entry_comments`.`publish` = 'Y'
        AND `entry_comments`.`deleted_at` IS NULL)
    OR
        `entry_comments`.`id` IS NULL
    )
AND `category` = 5

In the OR condition, I put entry_comments.id, assuming this is the primary key of the entry_comments table, so you should replace it with the real primary key of entry_comments.

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awesome! One problem though, now it seems to skip the entries with the comments having not null value in deleted_at. Any thoughts ? –  andyk Jul 21 '09 at 8:00
    
Well you have the condition "AND entry_comments.deleted_at IS NULL", so just remove it if you want the comments having not null value in deleted_at. –  FWH Jul 21 '09 at 8:01
    
but by doing this, it means that deleted comments will still add to the entry's total comments count ? –  andyk Jul 21 '09 at 8:05
    
I think in this case you'll have to execute two queries, one for non-deleted comments, and one for deleted comments. –  FWH Jul 21 '09 at 8:22
    
.. that wouldn't be very efficient though. –  andyk Jul 21 '09 at 9:01

It's because you are setting a filter on columns in the entry_comments table. Replace the first with:

AND IFNULL(`entry_comments`.`publish`, 'Y') = 'Y'

Because your other filter on this table is an IS NULL one, this is all you need to do to allow the unmatched rows from the LEFT JOIN through.

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replacing : "AND entry_comments.publish = 'Y'" with "AND ISNULL(entry_comments.publish, 'Y') = 'Y'" results in a syntax error. Or did I get that wrong ? –  andyk Jul 21 '09 at 7:51
    
Sorry, in MySQL it's IFNULL not ISNULL - have edited answer. –  David M Jul 21 '09 at 8:29
    
okay, IFNULL is new to me. How do you factor in the deleted_at ? as the comments counted should be published and have the deleted_at value at NULL –  andyk Jul 21 '09 at 8:54

Try changing the LEFT JOIN to a LEFT OUTER JOIN

OR

I'm no expert with this style of SQL joins (more of an Oracle man myself), but the wording of the left join is leading me to believe that it is joining entry_comments on to entries with entry_comments on the left, you really want it to be the other way around (I think).

So try something like:

LEFT OUTER JOIN entries ON entries.entry_id = entry_comments.entry_id

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1  
nope, iirc LEFT OUTER JOIN is a synonym of LEFT JOIN. –  andyk Jul 21 '09 at 8:08

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