Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Consider the following situation:

items = [
  {
    id: 1
    attributes: [
      { key: a, value: 2 }
      { key: b, value: 3 }
    ],
    requirements: null
  }
  {
    id: 2
    attributes: [
      { key: b, value: 2 }
    ],
    requirements: a > 2
  }
  {
    id: 3
    attributes: [
      { key: a, value: 1 }
      { key: c, value: 1 }
    ],
    requirements: a > 1 and b > 2
  }
  {
    id: 4
    attributes: [
      { key: a, value: 2 }
      { key: d, value: 7 }
    ],
    requirements: b > 5 and h < 10
  }
]

The expected result, adding together (sum) the various attributes is:

result = [
  { key: a, value: 3 }
  { key: b, value: 5 }
  { key: c, value: 1 }
]

As you can observe, there are dependencies (requirements) between objects in the list. In particular, the object with id: 4 (last one of the series) is discarded from the calculation since the condition b > 5 and h < 10 is never checked. On the contrary, the object with id: 2, initially discarded, then falls in the calculation as a result of the object with id: 3 (which, by adding 1 to the attribute a, makes true the condition a > 2).

What is the algorithm needed to obtain the required result having N objects?

Disclaimer: the proposed structure is only an example. You can suggest any changes you believe to achieve the result. I'm working in JavaScript (CoffeeScript) programming language, but any other will be okay.

share|improve this question
    
Do you have time or space complexity requirements? The obvious solution would be O(n^2) - did you discard this option? Also, you will need some way to store the requirements (your current code will evaluate them to a boolean when items is instantiated, so they can't be rechecked. Have you solved this problem, or is it also part of your question? –  Aaron Dufour Jul 20 '12 at 17:40
    
@AaronDufour The evaluation of requirements key is not intended to be done on object instantiation but on-the-fly whenever is called the sum method; I think it is necessary to establish some sort of link between each item's requirement conditions and the sum process (an event-driven approach?): each object should listen for changes in the array (item add/remove) and, if the conditions are met, changes its status in active=true (or something like that). Then the list object re-executes sum again, eventually causes other object to activate, and so on. In any case it's just an idea. –  Jerus Jul 23 '12 at 9:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Let's start by getting the data in a format we can use. We need to be able to test requirements at will, instead of only when the data object is instantiated:

  {
    id: 4
    attributes: [
      { key: a, value: 2 }
      { key: d, value: 7 }
    ],
    requirements: (sum) -> sum.b > 5 and sum.h < 10
  }

While we're at it, let's get the attributes in a more useful state (note that this isn't strictly necessary, but makes everything simpler):

  {
    id: 4
    attributes: {
      a: 2
      d: 7
    },
    requirements: (sum) -> sum.b > 5 and sum.h < 10
  }

Now I'll go through the naive algorithm, which is simplest and should fit your needs. Essentially, we'll keep looping over the data set, testing each one that hasn't been used yet and adding it to the sum if it passes.

changed = true
sum = {}
init(sum, items)
while changed
    changed = false
    for item in items
        if !item.used && item.requirements(sum)
            add(sum, item.attributes)
            changed = true
            item.used = true

I'll let you fill in the add and init functions. The add one should be simple; it adds each element in the second parameter to each element in the first. The init needs to set each element in sum that may be used (tested or added to) to 0.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your valuable suggestions and detailed explanation. I began testing an event-driven implementation to solve this problem but your approach is undoubtedly more clever and elegant. So less code, less complexity. Thanks again. –  Jerus Jul 26 '12 at 8:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.