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Recently found something peculiar in a filter, I can't believe its intended behaviour.

from django.contrib.auth.models import User
print User.objects.filter(id__in=User.objects.none().values_list("id",flat=True))
print User.objects.filter(id__in=User.objects.all().values_list("id",flat=True))

Oddly both of these lists return the full set of users. It actually seems to be pretty easy to "fix" if I wrap the inner query in a list function e.g.

User.objects.filter(id__in=list(User.objects.none().values_list("id")))

Then this returns what I would expect (an empty list).

Seems like a bug to me, or am I missing something?

Steve

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's the queries produced for both:

User.objects.filter(id__in=User.objects.none().values_list("id",flat=True))

SELECT "auth_user"."id",
       "auth_user"."username",
       "auth_user"."first_name",
       "auth_user"."last_name",
       "auth_user"."email",
       "auth_user"."password",
       "auth_user"."is_staff",
       "auth_user"."is_active",
       "auth_user"."is_superuser",
       "auth_user"."last_login",
       "auth_user"."date_joined"
FROM "auth_user"
WHERE "auth_user"."id" IN
    (SELECT U0."id"
     FROM "auth_user" U0) LIMIT 21

User.objects.filter(id__in=User.objects.all().values_list("id",flat=True))

SELECT "auth_user"."id",
       "auth_user"."username",
       "auth_user"."first_name",
       "auth_user"."last_name",
       "auth_user"."email",
       "auth_user"."password",
       "auth_user"."is_staff",
       "auth_user"."is_active",
       "auth_user"."is_superuser",
       "auth_user"."last_login",
       "auth_user"."date_joined"
FROM "auth_user"
WHERE "auth_user"."id" IN
    (SELECT U0."id"
     FROM "auth_user" U0) LIMIT 21

Notice anything? They're exactly the same queries. Also interesting is what happens if you try things like User.objects.none(), User.objects.filter(id__in=[]) and User.objects.filter(id__in=User.objects.none(). In all three of these circumstances, Django short-circuits the query. In other words, it doesn't even issue a query to the database because it determines beforehand that there will not be any results. My best guess here is that adding values_list to the end defeats the short-circuiting logic, allowing an actual query to be send, and that it's actually values_list that determines the query that should be sent. Which in both cases is really the same, when you think about it. Either way you want to select just id on an unfiltered queryset.

I emphasized that part, because I'm sure you're jumping up and down now saying but none should return an empty queryset. True, but it does so by virtue of automatically returning an EmptyQuerySet and never actually querying the database at all. It doesn't add any filters to the query.

Whether this is a bug or not is debatable. I'm more apt to call this an edge-case that most likely can't really be "fixed". It's a function of how all the interweaving parts come together in this one scenario.

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Thanks for the answer, and the detail you went into. Interesting to know it doesn't actually hit the DB, though it makes perfect sense that it wouldn't. Do you think the problem could be solved by adding a 'def values_list(): return []' to the EmptyQuerySet class? –  Steven Franklin Jul 20 '12 at 21:05
    
I don't think that in particular will work, but there might a way in general to override values_list such that it won't cause the query to be sent to the database. However, this is not really elegant: it would require subclassing EmptyQuerySet, QuerySet and Manager all just to get this to bubble-up and work properly, and since this is User you're working with, you'd have to monkey-patch User to add the custom manager. It's far more elegant to just adjust the code in place to account for this edge case, with an if statement checking if the queryset is empty before using it. –  Chris Pratt Jul 20 '12 at 21:49
    
That sounds like much harder work than applying list(). Which works, im just waiting for someone to look at it in 6 months and undo it thinking im instance for running list on a list :). Thanks for the explanation. –  Steven Franklin Jul 21 '12 at 13:34

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