Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am writing a simple char device driver. The function which we pass to module_init() is called at the time of module installation.

When we insert the module using insmod command the function passes to module_init() is gets called.

Is there any other method to call this module_init() function.

share|improve this question

If you are talking about using something else than insmod, then no: insmod is the only way I know to initialize your module.

Otherwise, this module_init thing is a macro and isn't really a function call (you cannot call a function from global scope in C). It expands to some predefined "module constructor" that calls your initializing function, depending on if you're compiling as a dynamic module or as an object built into the kernel. Its role is to avoid having to #ifdef a lot when developing a module and making the development process easier (see this).

So if, for some reason (but I discourage you doing this), you want to call your initializing function from your module code, then just call it directly. For example:

static void some_other_function(void) {
    // ...
    initialize();
    // ...
}

static int initialize(void) {
    // your initialization code
}

module_init(initialize);

Edit: removed __init following Eugene's comment.

However, I recommend only the module_init expansion calls your initialization function and that other common code be in a separate function:

static void some_other_function(void) {
    // ...
    something_that_might_get_called_afterwards_also();
    // ...
}

static int __init initialize(void) {
    // your initialization code (done only once)
    something_that_might_get_called_afterwards_also();
    // some other one-time code
}

module_init(initialize);
share|improve this answer
3  
If one is going to call initialize() from this example directly after the module has completed its initialization, I suppose, it is better not to mark it with __init. The functions marked this way (as well as the data marked with __init_data) are unloaded from memory by the loader after the module's initializition finishes. So calling them after that would result in a kernel oops. If they are not marked with __init, they will remain in memory and can be called. But I agree with @eepp, it is better not to do so and rather use a separate function. – Eugene Jul 21 '12 at 19:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.